Belmont County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society

PEASE TOWNSHIP

Biographies

PEASE TOWNSHIP

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, BELMONT COUNTY, OHIO

“History of the Upper Ohio Valley” Vol. II, 189

Presented by Linda Fluharty from hard copies provided

by Mary Staley & Phyllis Slater.

 

 

Pages 521-522.

WILLIAM A. ALLEN was born in 1858, on the farm where he now resides in

Belmont county, Ohio. Was the son of John and Sarah (Greenlee) Allen,

both natives of Ohio. John Allen was the son of John and Martha J.

(Giffin) Allen, who came from Scotland to America some time before

the Revolutionary war. William has, since his birth, been living on

the farm formerly owned by his father, where he still resides. His

education has all been received from the common schools of the county.

He was married in 1888 to Miss Annie Warrell, a daughter of William

and Margaret J. (Mealy) Warrell, of Washington, Penn. They are not as

yet blessed with any children. Mr. Allen by industry and perseverance,

bids fair to follow in the tracks of his worthy father. John Allen,

father of William, was born 1814, on his father’s farm in Belmont

county, on a part of which his son still resides. His life was principally

spent on the farm of his father, and in the early part of it

got an education from the common schools. He married in 1848, a Miss

Sarah Greenlee, born 1822, a native of this county, and a daughter of

James and Sarah Greenlee, who, from all the facts obtainable, were

from over the sea. By his first wife he was father of seven children,

only one of whom is living: Margaret A., Martha J., James, John, one

died in infancy, William, Lizzie B. William is the only living

representative of this family. Mrs. Sarah Allen died in 1861 on the

homestead farm, and at her death the family lost a kind mother and

loving parent, and the community a good citizen. John, the father

remarried in 1877, a Margaret McGregor, daughter of James McGregor,

a native of Pennsylvania. There were no children by the second

marriage. The second wife died after a short Illness. John Allen died

in 1886, and in his death the family lost a loving relative, and the

community one of her best citizens. He was always a strong supporter

of all educational matters, and a man who was always respected and

looked up to by his neighbors. The son, William, has by industry and

good management, maintained the family name and honor and is already

recognized as a man of much ability and resource in the community in

which he lives. He with his wife occupy the home of his ancestors and

has a fine, well improved farm and a pleasant residence.

 

Page 522.

JOHN ARMSTRONG, of Martin’s Ferry, one of the pioneer business men of

the upper Ohio valley, was born near Enniskillen, county of Fermanagh,

Ireland, February 15, 1806. His parents, Andrew and Mary Armstrong,

were married about 1804, and had five children, of whom John is the

only survivor. The father emigrated to Canada, and soon afterward

died there. John Armstrong was reared in Ireland, receiving a limited

schooling, and was engaged in farming until he was about thirty years

old, when in 1837 he came to the United States. He landed at New York,

but not finding employment there, he went to Pittsburgh, where he found

various employment until he secured the position of porter in a carpet

store, where he remained for some time working up to the position of

book-keeper. He came to Wheeling in 1845 and was engaged as a book-

keeper for two years, with Prior, Clark & Co., after which, in 1852,

he embarked in business in the Fifth ward. He conducted this quite

successfully for ten years, and since then has not been actively

engaged in business. He has made judicious investments, however, and

is interested in various manufactories, being a stockholder in the

Standard Iron works, the Benwood and AEtna works, and also has an

interest in the Ohio Valley and National banks of Wheeling.  In 1870

he came to Martin’s Ferry, which has since been his residence, and

in 1882 he, in company with William R. Ratcliff and others, organized

the Exchange bank of this city, of which he was elected president. Mr.

Armstrong is one of the pioneers in business in this region, and his

successful career, rising from poverty to a commanding position among

men, is one highly deserving of notice. He was married in October, 1856,

to Jane Hunter, of Pittsburgh, and they have two children: Jennie, the

wife of Dr. Harvey, and Margaret. Mr. Armstrong and wife are members of

the Presbyterian church.

 

Pages 522-523.

F. BAYHA, of the firm of Bayha Brothers, was born in Fulton, W. Va.,

in 1860. He learned the blacksmith, carriage ironer and horse-shoer’s

trades in the city of Wheeling, where he worked for ten years prior to

the establishment of the factory at Bridgeport, Ohio. His brother,

Andrew A. Bayha, also a skilled carriage maker and wood worker, was

born in Fulton in 1863. He acquired his knowledge of the business in

Wheeling, becoming an expert workman. After working in Wheeling for

eight years he, on November 1, 1887, formed a partnership with his

brother. Since this date they have operated the wagon and carriage

shops on Main street in the city of Bridgeport. This firm manufactures

on quite an extensive scale for so young a concern, and bids fair to

become a very large house. They manufacture all sorts and kinds of

wagons, buggies and carriages to order, and also carry a large assortment

of manufactured vehicles. They at present employ ten skilled

workmen in their shops. Besides the manufacture of carriages, Bayha

Brothers have a large trade in horse-shoeing. They make a specialty

of the latter industry, shoeing horses on scientific principles.

They also carry on a funeral repairing and jobbing business in all

departments. Enterprising and progressive as they are, it is only a

question of time until they will be obliged to enlarge their works, to

employ more men and to extend their business generally, providing the

same energy and wisdom is employed in the future as has been in the past.

 

Page 523.

JOSEPH BIRD, of Martin’s Ferry, general manager of the blast furnace at

that place, was born at Briher Hill, Staffordshire, England, in April,

  1. He is the son of Stephen Bird, who was an iron worker by occupation,

and did a great deal of work by contract, employing workmen, and also

owned and managed a small farm. He died from cholera in 1832. He was

twice married and had twelve children. His second wife, the mother of

the subject of this sketch, was Maria (Shakespeare) Shakespeare. Joseph

Bird had no educational advantages. In his childhood and when quite

young began working at an iron furnace, and continued to be so employed

until he came to the United States in 1851. He landed at New Orleans

after a voyage of three months, and then came up the Mississippi to St.

Louis, where he found employment at Brennan’s iron mills a short time.

Proceeding then to eastern Pennsylvania, he settled in the Lehigh valley,

where he remained some five years. Subsequently he went to Rochester,

NY., where he blew the first furnace in that city, thence went to

Pittsburgh and remained two years, and in 1875 came to Steubenville,

Ohio, which was his residence until 1879, when he settled at Martin’s

Ferry, and entered the employment of the Benwood iron company, as manager

of the blast furnace at this place. He is an acknowledged master of his

important business in all its many details, and is a competent and

successful manager. He was the first to make iron exclusively from

cinders, and though the process he discovered was no source of great

profit to him, he was the means of bringing about a great change in

iron working. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and

he is in politics a republican. Mr. Bird was married in 1850 to Susannah

Scriven, who started with him from England, and died on ship board and

was buried in the Gulf of Mexico. In 1852 he was married to Mary Jones,

of Pennsylvania, and they have had ten children, of whom these survive:

Mary J., Hanna and Clara.

 

Pages 523-524.

BENJAMIN F. BRADY, of Martin’s Ferry, a leading dry goods merchant, is a

native of Ohio, born in Jefferson county, February 7, 1843. He is the son

of Robert Brady, a native of Cannonsburg, Penn., who there learned the

tailor’s trade, and after coming to Ohio, when a young man, followed it

at Knoxville, until his death, about 1855. About the year 1841 he was

married to Elizabeth Clare, a native of Ohio, who is still living at

Knoxville. To this marriage were born seven children, five of whom are

living. Benjamin F. Brady was reared at Knoxville, and after his school

days were over, was engaged in clerking in various stores at that place

until the outbreak of the rebellion. In 1861 he enlisted under the first

call in Company I, Twentieth Ohio regiment, and served three months in

West Virginia. He then re-enlisted in the Second Ohio for three years,

and served in the army of the Tennessee, participating in the battles

of Lookout Mountain, Stone River, Mission Ridge, and other important

engagements. After the battle of Perrysville, he was promoted from the

ranks to second lieutenant, and after Stone River, to first lieutenant,

as which he was mustered out in the fall of 1864. After the war he re-

sided at various places until 1875, when he opened a general store at

Irondale, Ohio, which was his place of abode until 1882, when he came

to Martin’s Ferry. Since then he has conducted a dry goods, notions and

millinery business with much success, and is known as an active and popular

business man. He is a member of the Masonic and G. A. R. fraternities, and

in politics has been active as a republican. Mr. Brady was married in 1872

to Catherine McDonald, of Hammondsville, and they have one child, Elizabeth.

Mrs. Brady is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

 

Pages 524-525.

GEORGE W. CHESSELL, of Martin’s Ferry, a successful business man, was

born at Belmont in 1843. His grandfather, George Chessell, Sr., a native

of England, came to the United States and settled near Smithfield, Jefferson county,

where he learned the trade of a blacksmith, which he followed for many years.

He is still living, a resident of Hendrysburg,

Belmont county. His son, George the father of George W., was born in

England. He was married to Ann Davis, who died in 1887, and by this union

had twelve children, five of whom survive. The subject of this sketch received

his education at Hendrysburg. At the age of eighteen years he enlisted,

in 1861, in Company K, Fifteenth Ohio regiment, with which he served four

years and two months. During this period he passed through many great battles,

such as Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga and Chattanooga, and saw much severe

service. He was mustered out as quartermaster sergeant, at San Antonio, Texas,

in 1865. On his return to Ohio he engaged in the grocery business, at Hendrys-

burg, until 1874, when he was appointed postal clerk on the Baltimore & Ohio

road, running from Columbus to Grafton, and afterward from Newark to Chicago.

He remained in the employment of the government until November, 1888. On July

23, 1889, he had, in company with M. F. Earp, purchased the Gem laundry at

Martin’s Ferry, and to this business he has since given his attention. This

institution is well-known for the excellence of its work, and is quite popular

throughout the surrounding country. Mr. Chessell is a member of the Masonic

order, the I. O. O. F. and the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is a re-

publican. He was married, in 1866, to Sarah J. Hogue, of Jefferson county,

and they have three children: Alma, George W. and Harry E.

 

Page 525.

MATTHEW A. CHEW, general superintendent of the nail department of the

Laughlin nail company’s works, is a native of Pittsburgh, born March 14, 1857.

He is a grandson of Richard Chew, a native of England, who, before coming to

America in 1826, was a soldier in the British army. After coming to this

country he followed his trade as a nailer until his death in 1835. His son,

Matthew J., the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Trenton,

J., and received his education in the Catholic schools at Pittsburgh. He

learned the trade of a nailer at New Castle, Penn., and in 1858 came to

Wheeling, where he was engaged with the Belmont iron company. In 1864 he

became a stockholder in the Belmont iron company and removed to Ironton,

Ohio, but in 1866 he returned to Wheeling and was employed in the old Top

mill. His death occurred in 1878. By his marriage to Annie Adams, a native

of Pennsylvania, who survives, he had eleven children, seven of whom are

living. Matthew A. Chew, when fourteen years old, spent three months as

an apprentice with Bell, Atchison & Co., nail manufacturers, and then completed

his trade with his father. After this he worked uninterruptedly at

his trade, with the exception of seven months as a clerk in the store of

Joseph Graves, at Wheeling, until 1885. At the time of the strike in that

year he was elected national secretary of the U. N. N. and R. association,

and served in that capacity until the close of the strike in 1886.

He then purchased a half interest in the News Letter, at Wheeling, and was

connected with that paper until July, 1888. Resuming his trade, he worked

at the Spaulding nail works at Brilliant Ohio, until November, 1889, when

he was tendered his present position. He is widely known for his skill-

fullness, energy and enterprise. In politics he is a republican. Mr. Chew

was married in August, 1878, to Annie, daughter of Joseph Graves, of

Wheeling, and they have one child, Ella B.

 

Pages 525-526

WILLIAM CLARK, of Martin’s Ferry, an old resident of that place and

vicinity, is a native of Scotland, born at Kirkrubert, August 13, 1820.

His father, Hugh Clark, came to America with his family in 1822, and for

five years resided in Washington county, Penn., being then engaged in

brewing. In 1827 he came to Wheeling, and became a partner of Henry

Moore, for many years a prominent business man of that city. In 1842

he dissolved this partnership, having some time before acquired a tract

of land on the island, where he then engaged in gardening until 1852,

when he turned over the business to his eldest son, William, and made

a trip to Scotland. Returning in 1854, he died December 25, 1856. By

his marriage to Mary Manson, a native of Scotland, and a descendant of

John Maitland, one of the conclave who adopted the confession of faith,

together with shorter and larger cathecisms, and all the solemn leagues

which have successfully governed the great Presbyterian church all these

years, since the sixteenth century. He had six children, three of whom

survive. The mother died about 1867. The subject of this sketch was educated

at Wheeling, and then aided his father until as has been stated he

took entire charge of the gardening business on Wheeling Island. This

he conducted until 1859 when he come to Martin’s Ferry, and farmed and

gardened until 1874. In that year he and others organized the Ohio City

Nail company, of which he was elected president. To this enterprise he

donated twenty acres of ground, the present site of the nail works, also

gave 100 acres of coal in return for stock. About three years later the

company made an assignment, and the works were afterward bought by the

Laughlin Nail company. Mr. Clark was one of the greatest losers in the

old company, to the amount of about $120,000. He has throughout life been

enterprising and liberal in his relations to the public. In 1873 he

donated to the county the land on which the Ohio valley free pike was

built, and to the old Wheeling steel company, of which he was a director,

he gave eight acres, now the site of the Elson Glass works. In 1872 he

made an addition to the town, known as Clark’s addition, now mostly built

He has also been interested in banking, and with George H. Jenkins,

John Armstrong and others, organized the Ohio City bank, now known as the

Exchange bank, of which he was vice president. For several years Mr.

Clark has led a retired life. Of the Presbyterian church he is an active

member, has been elder for several years, was superintendent of the

Sunday-school of the First church of Wheeling some time, and actively

engaged in other Sunday-school work, and for many years superintended

a mission school and almost entirely supported it financially and

otherwise, and in 1883 was a commissioner to the general assembly of the

church at Saratoga. In politics he is a republican. Mr. Clark was married

September 26, 1849, to Margaret G. Culbertson, who died in May, 1870. To

this union eight children were born, of whom there are living: Clara G.,

Mary M., Sarah A., Thomas C., who is now a minister of the gospel of a

Presbyterian church near Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; Martha A., and Phoebe R.

In 1875 Mr. Clark was married to Annie E., daughter of Edward Mansfield,

of Jefferson county, Ohio.

 

Pages 526-527

JUDGE JOHN S. COCHRANE, a distinguished citizen of Martin’s Ferry, was

born In Belmont county, Ohio, September 9, 1841. His family in this

country, prominent in the early settlement, is descended from William

Cochrane, who was a native of England, and a cousin of Sir Thomas

Cochrane, Earl of Dumdonald, a British admiral. William Cochrane came

to America about 1765, and settled near West Liberty on what is now known

as the Jacobs and Dexton farms, which he acquired possession of by

tomahawk right. He lost his life at the hands of the Indians during that

savage raid, one incident of which was the famous leap of the frontiersman,

McCullough. He was shot after a desperate chase, just as he was in sight

of the block house at West Liberty. His companion, William Boggs, was

captured but made his escape and returned to his home at Wheeling, where

some of his descendants are still living. William Cochrane had three

sons, Thomas, James and Robert. The latter, grandfather of Judge Cochrane,

was born in 1770, and reared near West Liberty, but when quite a young man

he crossed to Ohio about the beginning of this century and settled near

Burlington, Belmont county, where he acquired a large tract of land, which

he resided upon until his death in 1860. Of his sixteen children, four are

living. His son, Robert, Jr., father of the subject of this sketch, was

born in Belmont county in 1814, and passed his life on a farm near Martin’s

Ferry, being one of the leading citizens of that vicinity. He died in 1863,

from fever which he contracted in a southern hospital while trying to save

the life of his son, Watson, then a prisoner of war. He was married about

1835 to Susannah Davis, by whom he had thirteen children, eleven of whom

were reared. Six of the seven sons served in the Union army, but all

escaped death, though two were severely wounded. When the father went

south he left the large farm in charge of his wife and four daughters.

In the midst of a severe winter, and they were compelled to haul feed

through fifteen inches of snow to save their live stock with but slight

assistance from others. Their heroic efforts sufficed, however, to prevent

any loss until the arrival of one of the sons, who secured a discharge

and came home. They managed the farm until it was sold. The widow of

Robert, Jr., is still living. Judge Cochrane was reared in Belmont

county, and at twenty years of age, he enlisted in Company K, Fifteenth

Ohio regiment, in the fall of 1861, with his brother, R. H. Cochrane,

elsewhere mentioned. After one year’s service he came home and administered

on the estate of his deceased father. After the close of the war he

determined to adopt the profession of law, and studied three years with

Hon. William Kennon, judge of the supreme court of Ohio. He then began

the practice at St. Clairsville, but soon afterward removed to Sedalia,

Mo., where he followed his profession with success for ten years. He was

elected prosecuting attorney and served one term, and in 1868 was

elected judge of the court of common pleas, a position he filled with

credit until 1872. In 1876 he removed to Wheeling, and practiced there

until 1882, when he removed to Martin’s Ferry, where he is still in the

practice of law. He has always taken an active part in public affairs,

and has been public-spirited and enterprising. In the republican party

he has been quite prominent, and in 1888 was elected by his party as

elector for the seventeenth congressional district. Judge Cochrane is now

president of the Electric Light company of this place. He was married in

1867 to Mattie W. Weldin, of Wheeling. He and wife are members of the

Presbyterian church, and he is a member of the Knights of Honor, the

Maccabees and the National Union fraternities.

 

Pages 527-528

B. CRAWFORD, postmaster and grocer of Blaine, Belmont county, Ohio, is a

son of William F. and Harriet Crawford, of whom mention is made elsewhere

in this book. Mr. Crawford was born April 5, 1852. His early life was

passed in Bridgeport, where he received a common school education. After

obtaining his schooling he engaged in the grocery business, first with his

brother in Bridgeport. After remaining with his brother for five years he

sold his interest in the business and removed to Richland township, where

he entered the dairy business. Four years later, Mr. Crawford returned to

Pease township, and operated a farm for three years. Subsequently, in 1887,

he established the grocery business, which he now conducts, having met

with marked success. He was appointed postmaster at Blaine, July 10, 1889,

and took charge of the office July 23, 1889. Mr. Crawford has been a school

director of the township, serving to the satisfaction of all concerned. In

1881, he married Miss Fannie, daughter of Edward and Catherine Simpson. Mrs.

Crawford was born March 3, 1863; the mother, Catherine Simpson, was born,

December 25, 1843, and the father November 27, 1841. The following named

children have been born to them: Carl E., born March 19, 1882; Gertrude,

born March 20, 1884; Harriet C., born April 16, 1885; David R., born July 29,

1887, and Francis H., born December 3, 1889. Mr. Crawford is a member of the

Masonic Order of Bridgeport, and Mrs. Crawford is a regular communicant of

the Presbyterian church. W. B. Crawford is a man who has gained the respect

and esteem of his fellow townsmen, and is regarded as a business man of much

foresight and ability.

 

Pages 528-529

REV. DR. FRANK S. De HASS was born in Washington county, Penn., October 1,

  1. The family was originally German, being known by the name of Von Hass,

and having three distinct branches. The family were Protestant Huguenots,

emigrated to Holland, and in 1772 some portion of them came to America and

settled in Pennsylvania. Gen. John Philippy Hass, of Revolutionary memory,

was an immediate ancestor of the subject of our notice. Dr. De Hass was

educated at Washington college, Penn., and was licensed as a Methodist

preacher in 1843. His first appointment was at Leesburg, Ohio, in connection

with the Pittsburgh conference. He was ordained deacon in 1845,

and elder in 1857. In 1845 he was stationed at Murrysville, Penn.; in 1846,

Weston, Va.; in 1847-’48, Wheeling; in 1849-’50, agent of Allegheny college;

in 1851-’52, Wesley college, Pittsburgh; 1853-’54, secretary of “Tract

Society,” in Methodist church; in 1855-’56, Trinity church, Pittsburgh; in

1857-’58, again secretary of Tract Society; in 1859-’60, Seventh street, New

York; 1861-’62, Washington street, Brooklyn. He was appointed to the Pacific

Street church, Brooklyn, in 1863, and three years later went to the Metropolitan

church, in Washington city, where he remained three years. Among the

attendants at this church were, President Grant, Vice-president Colfax,

Chief Justice Chase and many other distinguished individuals. Two years

were then spent with Trinity church, Cincinnati, and two subsequent years’

travel in Europe, Egypt and Palestine. In the Holy Land he secured a rare

manuscript of the Book of Moses, found in a tomb supposed to date a century

before Christ. April 1, 1872, he was appointed to the Lexington Avenue

church, New York. He received the degree of D. D. from Michigan

university, in 1870. Dr. De Hass enjoyed considerable reputation as an

eloquent speaker. Various sermons at camp meetings were spoken of as grand

in the extreme. On one occasion he chained the attention of 10,000 persons

for one hour and twenty minutes. He attended the general Sunday-school

convention held in London, in 1862, and at one of the sessions made a

speech of marked beauty and power. His publications are principally sermons.

At the time of his appointment to the consulate at Jerusalem, Dr. De Hass

was pastor of the Lexington Avenue Methodist church, New York city, which

charge he resigned soon after. A gentleman of high social culture and of

varied learning and accomplishments, he was amply qualified for all the

requirements of his office and made a worthy representative of our country

abroad. In addition to his consular duties Dr. De Hass devoted his leisure

hours to biblical researches in and around Jerusalem. After his return

from the Holy Land and the last years of his life were spent principally

in travel. Some ten years before his death he came to Martin’s Ferry, where

he owned some property, and on account of his mother living here. Three

years before his death symptoms of cancer began to appear on the lower

part of his face, and was ultimately the cause of his death, which

occurred December 8, 1889. He never took an active part in politics, but

was ever identified with the republican party. He was also a member of

the Masonic order.

 

Page 529

JAMES H. DRENNEN is a native of Steubenville, Ohio, was brought up on a

farm from his fifth to his fourteenth year, at which time he went to

Pittsburgh to serve an apprenticeship to a cabinet and chair maker whose

place of business was corner of Third and Smithfield streets. In 1837

he went to Mt. Pleasant, Jefferson Co., Ohio, to work at his trade. There

he married, and purchasing a farm in Pease township, three miles distant

from Martin’s Ferry, where he continued to reside till the care of the

News requiring all his attention, he removed to Martin’s Ferry, where he

has since resided. Since he has had control of the News, the place has

grown from a village of 1,800, to a city of 7,000 to 8,000 inhabitants;

from one railroad, the Cleveland & Pittsburgh, it has two in operation,

and another nearly completed, which will open up additional communications

with the entire country, and give several other railroads access to the

city and the east via the splendid railroad bridge connecting the city

with Wheeling, which will be completed in June. During the existence of

the News, manufacturing of iron and glass has been firmly established in

the little city where it is published, for which that paper is certainly

entitled to a due share of credit, as it has always given prominence to

all enterprises which Mr. Drennen believed would tend to building up the

town of his adoption. While the News has never been a partisan sheet, it

has always contended for a protective tariff, and while Mr. Drennen remains

in control, it may be depended on to favor any policy which will create and

foster a diversified industry.

 

Pages 529-530

GEORGE DUNCAN, of Martin’s Ferry, a prominent attorney, was born in Allegheny

county, Penn., May 11, 1841. He is the son of Thomas Duncan, a native of

Pennsylvania, who was reared in Allegheny county, and learned the trade of

wool-carding. He became the owner of a carding mill about ten miles north

of Pittsburgh on the Allegheny road, which he operated about forty years.

Disposing of this in 1862, he purchased a farm on which he resided until his

death. November 19, 1864. He was married in 1838, to Nancy Herdman, by whom

he had six children, of whom three besides the subject of this sketch, are

living. The mother also survives. George Duncan received his early education

in the common schools of Allegheny county, and in the Valley academy, and

when about nineteen years old began the study of law with Thomas Howard and

John D. Mahon, of Pittsburgh. Removing subsequently to Columbiana county, Ohio,

he completed his studies with J. D. King, and in November, 1865, he was

admitted to the bar of Mahoning county. While pursuing these professional

studies he had followed teaching in Pennsylvania and Ohio. Beginning the

practice in Columbiana county, in 1867, he remained there seven years, and

then went to Norwalk, Ohio, which was his residence until he removed to

Martin’s Ferry, in the spring of 1878. Here he has attained a creditable

place in his profession, and is widely known as a learned and successful

lawyer. Mr. Duncan was married in 1863, to Maggie Hall, of Allegheny

county, by whom he has three children: Thomas M., Nannie V., and Lottie.

 

Page 530

WILLIAM K. ELSON, of Martin’s Ferry, one of the most enterprising manufacturers

of the upper Ohio valley, was born in Stark county, Ohio, November 27, 1833.

He is the son of John and Harriet Elson, the former of whom died when the

subject of this sketch was but nine months old. In 1837 the latter came to

Wheeling with his mother, and in that city attended the then indifferent

schools until he was twelve years old, after which he entered the employment

of Barnes, Hobbs & Co. He then learned the trade of a glass blower, and became

a master of that craft. He did not leave the employment of this company until

he was about twenty-nine years of age, when, in 1863, in company with John

Oesterling, Peter Castle, James Leisure and others, he started a small

factory at Wheeling, which has since developed into the Central Glass works.

He remained with this glass manufacturing company until January, 1878, when

he became associated with the Belmont glass house, of Bellaire, and remained

there five years. In 1881, he joined with M. Sheets and others in the

organization of the Elson Glass company at Martin’s Ferry, of which he has

acted as president, and now holds the position of general. manager. W. H.

Robinson is now president of the company. Mr. Elson’s residence at Martin’s

Ferry began in 1885, and though a comparatively recent comer, he is accorded

a prominent place in business and social circles, and is highly esteemed by

all. His political affiliation is with the republican party. Mr. Elson was

married in 1855, and has three children. Mrs. Elson is a member of the

Methodist Episcopal church.

 

Pages 530-531

HENRY FLOTO, president of the Northwood Glass company, of Martin’s Ferry,

was born in Brunswick, Germany, in 1839. He is the son of Lewis and Caroline

(Frohme) Floto, natives of Germany. The father, who died in 1850, was a

shoemaker by trade, and also engaged in farming. The mother is still living

in Germany. Henry Floto received a limited education in Germany and learned

the craft of a glass-blower, at which he was engaged until he came to the

United States in 1863. He found employment at Steubenville about one year,

then worked at McKee’s Glass works at Pittsburgh, afterward at various

places, and in 1866 came to Martin’s Ferry and entered the employment of

Sweeney & McCluny. Soon afterward he and his brother purchased the bakery

establishment of J. Ensley, and this he still conducts. He is also a

stockholder and president of the Northwood Glass company. He has been

highly successful in business, and is one of the most enterprising men

of the town. No less than thirteen residences and other buildings have

been erected by him in Martin’s Ferry, and he is active in the public

interests. Mr. Floto also owns large tracts of land in Tennessee. He was

married in 1866 to Margaret Roller, of Steubenvile, and nine children

have been born to them: George, Hattie, Frank, Henry, Christian, Emma,

William, Minnie (deceased), and Charles. He is a member of the Lutheran,

and his wife of the Catholic, church.

 

Page 531

W. GILMORE is a native of Ohio, born in the town of Smithfield, Jefferson

county, that state. His parents, John and Elizabeth, were both natives of

Maryland. In 1869 he moved to Bridgeport, Ohio. Some five years after his

removal to Bridgeport, he entered the grocery business, and still occupies

the stand where he commenced trading. The business, urged on by his thrift

and foresight, has steadily increased, year by year, until at the present

time he ranks among the leading grocers of Bridgeport. Mr. Gilmore is a

member of Belmont lodge, K. of P., of Bridgeport. Politically, he is a

“liberal” democrat.

 

Pages 531-532

THOMAS L. GLESSNER, president of the Laughlin Nail company, is a native of

Zanesville, Ohio, and a son of Jacob Glessner, one of the pioneer

publishers of eastern Ohio. Jacob Glessner was born in Somerset county,

Penn., where he learned the printer’s trade. In 1834 he removed to St.

Clairsville, Ohio, and, in company with his brother, purchased the St.

Clairsville Gazette, which they published about five years. He then went

to Zanesville, and published the Aurora, the leading democratic organ,

for six years, after which he established a family Journal, known as the

Zanesville City Times, which he conducted for over twenty years. In 1867

he sold the paper and purchased the Zanesville paper mill, which he managed

until 1886, since when he has been retired from business. While at St. Clairs-

ville he was married to Miss Laughlin, of Wheeling, and five children have

been born to them, of whom one is deceased. Thomas L. Glessner, after

receiving his education at Zanesville, entered the Benwood Iron works,

and there remained six years, having charge of the Benwood office. In 1878,

in company with his uncle, Alexander Laughlin, he purchased the Ohio City

Iron and Nail works, at Martin’s Ferry, and organized the Laughlin Nail

company, of which he acted as secretary until the death of Mr. Laughlin

in 1885, when he assumed his present position. The works were partially

destroyed by fire in 1882 and again in 1886, but each time were rebuilt

and enlarged, and they are now the second largest nail works in the world.

Mr. Glessner is also president of the Laughlin and Junction Steel company,

which built and operates the Bessemer Steel works at Mingo Junction. He has

been a resident of Wheeling since 1872, and is regarded as one of its

foremost citizens. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, and

he is in political matters a republican. He was married in 1879, to a

daughter of George R. Taylor, elsewhere mentioned, and one child, Mary,

has been born to this union.

 

Page 532

F. HANDEL, the subject of this sketch, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany,

August 28, 1840. Four years later his parents came to the United States and

settled at Pasco Station, Ohio. Learning the printer’s trade in Wheeling,

he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he worked at his trade until the

outbreak of the late war. Heeding his adopted country’s call, he was among

the first to enroll himself on the roster of the Ninth regiment of the

Ohio volunteer infantry, whose fortunes he bravely followed through the

trying scenes of the battles of Rich Mountain, Fairfax Ferry, Mills’s

Springs, Shiloh, Perryville, Chickamauga and Resaca. Having been honorably

discharged in the year 1864, he went to New York, where he followed his

trade for one year, after which he returned to Ohio and established a

grocery business at Pasco, his father’s old home. Mr. Handel remained at

Pasco until 1871, then removed to Wheeling, where he became a member of

the firm of Klein & Handel, wholesale dealers in notions. In 1883 he

again moved, this time to Bridgeport, Ohio. He established a grocery

house here which he still presides over, and under his guidance does an

increasingly prosperous business. Mr. Handel married Miss Elizabeth

Breidenstein in 1870. Miss Breidenstein was the daughter of Caspar

Breidenstein, one of the most prominent and honored of Bridgeport’s

Pioneers. Two sons, Willie and Albert, are the result of this union. The

qualities that made him a true, courageous soldier, a successful business

man and an upright citizen, won him the regard of his fellow townsmen, and

in 1886, their vote placed him in the city council. A member of the republican

party, yet respected by all parties. The family are members of the German

Lutheran church of Wheeling.

 

Pages 532-533.

JOSEPH T. HANES, of Martin’s Ferry, a prominent business man, was born at

that place, July 7, 1839. His father, James Hanes, a native of Pennsylvania,

came to Martin’s Ferry in 1855, and was one of the first settlers, erecting

one of the first dwelling houses. His occupation was marble-cutting, which

he followed until his death in 1862. In 1827 he was married to Rebecca

Hadsell, a native of Pennsylvania, who died July 18, 1889, aged eighty-ejght

years. These parents had eight children, all of whom are living. The subject

of this sketch received his education in the old log school-house on Lucas

street, and in the Union school, and then took a commercial course with the

intention of starting a commercial school, but this was prevented by the war

of the rebellion. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, of the Fifteenth Ohio

regiment, and served until 1865. He was captured at the battle of Chickamauga,

and for over sixteen months was confined at Andersonville and other military

prisons, at one time almost suffering death from scurvy. When exchanged in

November, 1864, he was completely broken down and required crutches to move

about. After the war he took up his father’s business, which he carried on

until 1874, when failing health compelled him to abandon it and he engaged

in the real estate business. In this he does a considerable business, and

is also interested in building associations, one of which, the Franklin, he

started in 1879. He also acts as a notary public and insurance and steamship

agent. He has taken an active interest in politics as a republican, and has

been influential in municipal affairs, having, as councilman, been instru-

mental in securing water works. He is a member of the Presbyterian church,

and of the Masonic, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and National Union

fraternities. Mr. Hanes was married in 1869 to Anna Clyker, of Wheeling,

by whom he has had three children, Gertrude C., Lyman S., and James W.,

deceased.

 

Page 533.

CHARLES A. H. HELLING, of Martin’s Ferry, Ohio, secretary of the Northwood

Glass works of that city, was born in Derenthal, province of Brunswick,

Germany, March 24, 1847. He is the son of Henry and Sophia Helling, who

came to this country about 1849. They remained at Wheeling some two years,

and then came to Martin’s Ferry, their subsequent residence. Henry Helling

was one of the leading men of his day, being for many years the leading

coal dealer of Martin’s Ferry, and interested in nearly all the enterprises

of the place. He was a member of the Ohio City Nail mill company, now I

known as the Laughlin Nail mill company, the Buckeye Glass company, the

Martin’s Ferry Stone company, and was one of the organizers of the old Ohio

City bank known as the Exchange bank at present, and of the Northwood Glass

company. In other business channels he also acted as a public-spirited man,

and was one of the organizers of the German Lutheran church. He died May 27,

1889, but his wife survives. They were the parents of five children, one of

whom is deceased. The subject of this sketch after attending the schools of

Martin’s Ferry in his youth, went into business with his father as book-

keeper, a position he held until January, 1888, when he took the position

of shipping clerk. In 1889 he was elected secretary of the company which he

now efficiently serves. He and wife are members of the German Lutheran church.

He was married December l0, 1872, to Kate Dorsch, of Martin’s Ferry, who died

in 1873, leaving one child, Charles G. In October, 1874, Mr. Helling was

married to Annie Burk, daughter of Frederick Burk, born in the Province of

Wurtemberg, Germany. They have three sons and three daughters, one son having

died.

 

Page 533.

WILLIAM E. HERVEY, M. D., a successful physician and surgeon of Martin’s

Ferry, was born in Ohio county, W. Va., October 2, 1855. He is a grandson

of William Hervey, one of the early residents of the state of West Virginia,

a farmer by occupation, and an influential citizen. Thomas H. Hervey, son

of the latter, and the father of Dr. Hervey, was born in Ohio county. He

followed farming and stock-raising and was a prosperous and worthy man.

By his marriage in 1851 to Rachel A. Maxwell, he had eight children, all

of whom are living. Dr. Hervey was reared in Ohio county, and was educated

at the West Liberty Normal school, the academy at Cannonsburgh, Penn., and

at the Washington and Jefferson college, where he was graduated. In 1879

he began the study of medicine under Dr. J. T. Carter, of Triadelphia, and

in the following year he entered the medical college of Ohio, at Cincinnati,

where he was graduated in 1882. He opened an office at Martin’s Ferry in

the same year, and has since then been actively engaged in the practice.

He is held in high regard as a physician and as a citizen. The doctor was

married in October, 1886, to Jennie, daughter of John Armstrong, elsewhere

mentioned. They have one child, Margaret A. Dr. Hervey and wife are members

of the Presbyterian church.

 

Page 534.

JAMES L. HIGGINS was born in Bridgeport, Ohio, April 20th, 1854, of Irish-

American parentage; his father being a native of Ireland, and his mother a

native of Ohio. Mr. Higgins’s early life was passed in the public schools

of Bridgeport. He filled various situations satisfactorily until the year

1881, when an opportunity for entering the grocery trade offered itself,

which he accepted. Having succeeded to the business of Joseph Waterman,

he brought to it the energy and uprightness which had always characterized

him, and which have made him the successful business man that he is. He

has since added to his grocery business by establishing a line of transfer

wagons, which are run in connection with the C. & P. railroad. Mr. Higgins

is an acceptable member of the following secret orders: K. G. E. Washington

castle No. 5, of Bridgeport; Belmont lodge, No, 109, K. of P.; and also the

Knights of Labor and Knights of Maccabees. In politics he is a republican.

In 1885 Mr. Higgins was married to Azelia Rosa, of Wheeling, a communicant

of the Methodist Episcopal church. Two sons, Arthur and Paul, have blessed

their union.

 

Pages 534-535.

THOMAS HILL – One of the most skillful machinists of Bridgeport is Thomas

Hill. Mr. Hill is an Englishman by birth, having been born in that country,

July 6, 1840, in Dunstairs, Elton township, Lancashire. His parents were

John and Rebecca Hill, also natives of England, John Hill was born in the

year 1817, and his wife 1819. They reared a family of four sons and two

daughters, one of the daughters is now deceased. Thomas Hill, the principal

of this biography, lived in England until he had reached manhood. He learned

the machinist’s trade in his native land. May 24, 1861, he was united in

marriage to Sarah A. Leach, daughter of James and Elizabeth Leach, both

English born. Mr. and Mrs. Hill and one son emigrated to this country July

6, 1863. After their arrival, Mr. Hill worked at his trade in Massachusetts

for three years, then returned to England, but in one year came back to the

United States and took up his residence in Bridgeport, Ohio. Until the

spring of 1870 Mr. Hill was employed in the shops of Spence, Wiley & Gray,

machinists of Martin’s Ferry. At this time he started the shop which he now

occupies. Mr. and Mrs. Hill have had five sons and six daughters, seven of

these children are now living. Mr. Hill is a member of the Masonic order,

Knights of Pythias, and Sons of St. George; he is also an active and influential

communicant of the Presbyterian church, and is very prominent in

M. C. A. work. He is always ready to give of his means and time to any

public improvement, or to aid the needy and afflicted.

 

Page 535.

STEPHEN HIPKINS, Jr., proprietor of the Novelty Model works, of Martin’s

Ferry, was born in England, July, 1841. His father, who bore the same name,

was a blacksmith by trade, and after coming to this country, followed his

trade for a number of years, being for some time in the employment of the

Ohio Central railroad, and afterward in business for himself. He resided

successively at Philadelphia, Zanesville, Ohio, and Bellaire, living in

the latter place from 1859 for fifteen years. Since then he has resided

upon a farm. He was married in England to Eliza Brown, who survives, and

they had ten children, seven of whom are living. The subject of this sketch

was eight years old when he came to this country, and when about fourteen

years old, became an apprentice in iron working with H. & P. Blandey, of

Zanesville, and after removing to Bellaire, entered the employment of the

Central Ohio railroad, and completed the trade of locomotive machinist.

He served as a foreman with the company until 1861 or 1862, and then was

engaged a year at Zanesville, after which he entered the service of the

Cleveland & Pittsburgh road at the Wellsburg shops. Soon afterward he

removed to Bellaire and established a shop, in connection with which he

made glass molds for the Belmont glass company, an occupation to which

his attention was turned while working for some years with George Barnes,

who was employed in that manner. After working at Wheeling for Hobbs,

Brockunier & Co., he came to Martin’s Ferry, to take charge of the mold

department of the Buckeye Glass works. This position he resigned in 1884

and engaged in a limited way on his own account in the manufacture of

glass molds, with the assistance of his sons. By hard work and per-

severance this business has grown to be the largest of the kind in the

valley outside of Pittsburgh. The reputation of his goods is wide spread,

and they have a ready sale. He is a public-spirited citizen, takes an

active part in municipal affairs, having been a member of the city council,

and now holding the office of president of the water works board, and in

politics he is an earnest republican. He is a member of the Methodist

Episcopal church, and of the Masonic, Knights of Honor, Odd Fellows, and

A. R. fraternities, having been qualified for membership in the latter

by service in Company I, One Hundred and Seventieth Ohio infantry. Mr.

Hipkins was married in 1862 to Maggie H. Heatherington, of Bellaire, and

they have eight children: Bertie, George, Howard, Emma, Jessie, Laura,

and Frank and Flora, twins.

 

Pages 535-536.

ROBERT T. HOWELL is the son of one of those old stalwarts whose footsteps

can be traced upon the pages of pioneer history so long as men remain true

to the past, and do not forget the teachings of their fathers. David E.

Howell came to this country from Wales, at the time when the infant

Republic was most in need of true sons. He settled in Bridgeport in its

early days, where he engaged in the wagon and carriage business, afterward

becoming a grocer. He served as justice of the peace of Pease township,

for twenty-eight years, and was postmaster at Bridgeport for eight or nine

years. He married Susan Marders, a native of Mississippi, by whom he had

thirteen children. After a life of usefulness and probity, he died in the

city of his adoption, having lived there for forty-five years. Mrs. Howell

is still living. Robert Howell came into this world November 22, 1841.

After receiving a practical education in the Bridgeport common schools

he became connected with his father in the hardware business, the name

of the firm being D. E. Howell & Son. He continued with his father for

six years, when he sold his interest to him and went into the produce

business, engaging in this for some fifteen years, after which he

entered the insurance and real estate business, which he continues to

the present time. In 1885 Mr. Howell was elected justice of the peace

of Pease Township, which position he still occupies. On May 7, 1867, he

married Rebecca L. Worthington, a daughter of the Rev. N. C. Worthington,

a Methodist minister of Bridgeport, at that time, now located in Muskingum

county, Ohio. Five children have come to bless their lives, all of them

living. W. W. holds a position with the Warfield Grocery company, of

Quincy, Ill.; Charles W., Frank, Maggie and Susie still remain at home.

Mr. Howell is a member of Bridgeport lodge, No. 181, F. & A. M.; Belmont

chapter, No. 141, also of Bridgeport lodge, No. 109, K. of P. He served

his country bravely during her struggle, as a member of Company A, One

Hundred and Seventieth Ohio volunteer infantry Politically, he is a

staunch republican. Mrs. Howell is a member of the Methodist Episcopal

church, and a worthy companion of her husband’s life. John C. Kehrer, of

Martin’s Ferry, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany; in 1831, the son of John

Kehrer, who was a gardener and grape raiser, by occupation. He died in 1853,

and his wife 1851. Mr. Kehrer received good educational advantages in

Germany up to his fourteenth year, when he was apprenticed for three years,

to a stone mason. Subsequently he followed his trade in that country two

years, as a journeyman, and then, in 1849, came to the United States. On

landing, he came directly to Wheeling, and followed his trade there until

  1. He then took a tour through the west, visiting all the large cities,

and on his return, crossed to Martin’s Ferry, and in partnership with

others, purchased a tract of thirty-one acres, upon which he began the

culture of grapes. As soon as the vineyard was producing, they provided

a cellar, and under the firm name of Scheele & Kehrer, began the production

of wine. This was the first wine cellar in the valley, and the qualities

of the soil for wine production was not yet known. The experiment has,

however, under the skillful management of Mr. Kehrer, proved to be an entire

success, and the product of their vineyard finds a ready market in all the

cities of the land. The firm now has about fifteen acres of land devoted

to vineyard, and produces four to five thousand gallons of wine per year.

Mr. Kehrer is recognized as one of the most competent wine producers of

the valley, and as a citizen, he is highly esteemed. He is a member of the

German Lutheran church, has been a Mason since 1856, and is a republican.

He was married in 1851, to Matilda Cook, of Wheeling, and they have had

six children: Jeannette, Albert, Matilda, Emma, Lizzie and Clara, the two

latter being deceased.

 

Pages 536-537.

JOHN C. KEHRER, of Martin’s Ferry, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany;

in 1831, the son of John Kehrer, who was a gardener and grape raiser,

by occupation. He died in 1853, and his wife 1851. Mr. Kehrer

received good educational advantages in Germany up to his

fourteenth year, when he was apprenticed for three years, to a

stone mason. Subsequently he followed his trade in that country two

years, as a journeyman, and then, in 1849, came to the United States. On

landing, he came directly to Wheeling, and followed his trade there until

  1. He then took a tour through the west, visiting all the large cities,

and on his return, crossed to Martin’s Ferry, and in partnership with

others, purchased a tract of thirty-one acres, upon which he began the

culture of grapes. As soon as the vineyard was producing, they provided

a cellar, and under the firm name of Scheele & Kehrer, began the production

of wine. This was the first wine cellar in the valley, and the qualities

of the soil for wine production was not yet known. The experiment has,

however, under the skillful management of Mr. Kehrer, proved to be an entire

success, and the product of their vineyard finds a ready market in all the

cities of the land. The firm now has about fifteen acres of land devoted

to vineyard, and produces four to five thousand gallons of wine per year.

Mr. Kehrer is recognized as one of the most competent wine producers of

the valley, and as a citizen, he is highly esteemed. He is a member of the

German Lutheran church, has been a Mason since 1856, and is a republican.

He was married in 1851, to Matilda Cook, of Wheeling, and they have had

six children: Jeannette, Albert, Matilda, Emma, Lizzie and Clara, the two

latter being deceased.

 

Pages 537-538.

ROBERT KIRKWOOD, the subject of the following sketch, was born near Newark,

Del., in 1756. His ancestors were Scotch, but in the latter part of the

seventeenth century a branch of the family removed to the north of Ireland.

In this Scotch settlement, near Derry, about 1731, lived two brothers,

William and Robert Kirkwood, both born in Ireland. These are the first

names in the connection that have come down to us. William, some ten or

twelve years the senior, died in Ireland, leaving a widow with two

children. Robert, the younger brother, the father of our subject, when

a very young man, concluded to emigrate to America. He set sail about 1732,

with the widow and children of his brother William, and landed in Newcastle,

Del., some time in the year. They soon made their way to a farm two miles

northwest of Newark. Mr. Kirkwood, though in reduced circumstances at the

time of his arrival, by dint of industry and economy became in a few years

the owner of this farm on which he had found his first American home. He

married a Miss McDowell, a member of the Society of Friends. Their family

contained an only son, and he was given his father’s name – Robert. With a

view to his preparation for the Christian ministry he was given a classical

training in the Newark academy. But the commencement of hostilities with

Great Britain aroused the patriotism of the youthful student; he enlisted

in the Delaware regiment commanded by Col. Hazlett, and was made a

lieutenant at the early age of twenty. Kirkwood was with the army of

Washington at New York, participated in the Long Island campaign, and was

in the battles of Princeton, Trenton and Brandywine. After the death of Col.

Hazlett, who fell at Princeton, he was appointed captain, an office in which

he served until the close of the war. It has been asked why a soldier of

Capt. Kirkwood’s merit was never promoted to a higher rank. Suffice it to

say that in the disastrous battle of Camden the Delaware regiment was

reduced from eight to two companies, and required, therefore, no higher

office than a captain. The soldiers who had been under Hazlett’s command

were taken to South Carolina by Gen. Gates in 1780. Capt. Kirkwood bore

an honorable part in the battles of Camden, the Cowpens, Guilford, and

others. “During all that southern campaign,” it has been said, “he was the

first in the British lines, and also in their works. Nine of the enemy’s

fortifications were successively taken, and in them our hero was always

the first to place a foot. For his great services he repeatedly received

thanks from Generals Greene, Morgan, and Smallwood. His individual

exertions obtained a peculiar renown for what remained of the Delaware

regiment. At the close of the war, Capt. Kirkwood, through the influence

of Washington, was brevetted a major. He returned to his native state,

and was received by his fellow-citizens with distinguished honors. His

friends in Delaware numbered almost the entire population.” Major Kirk-

wood married a Miss England, and their residence was for some time at

Cantwell’s Bridge, now Odessa, Del. About 1788 or ’89, he removed to Ohio,

immediately west of Wheeling, Va. He was said to have been the first

white man to fix his home in that section of what was then the north-

western territory. His house, built chiefly by his own hands, was a log

cabin, covered with bark. He was exposed to the attacks of neighboring

Indians, who, as he soon learned, were designing to make him a captive.

On being informed of their intentions, he secured the assistance of a

few soldiers from Wheeling. Armed with muskets, they awaited the attack,

which was made near midnight. The Indians, finding the door barred, set

fire to the bark roof. At Kirkwood’s order the roof was knocked off with

the butts of their muskets, the assailants, seen by the light of the

burning roof, were fi,red upon and pursued. Several Indians were killed,

the rest fled, and the major with his party escaped unhurt. During the

first years of Washington’s administration great depredations were com-

mitted by the Indians in many parts of the northwest territory. To repel

these savages and afford protection to settlers, an army was raised in

1791 and placed under the command of Gen. St. Clair. In the memorable

defeat of that year (November 4), Kirkwood fell, mortally wounded. All

we know of his last moments is stated by Col. Slough, a fellow officer,

is a letter written thirty. years after the event. He said: “Capt.

Kirkwood had been sick for several days previous to the 4th of November,

but was always ready for duty. At the dawn of day, that morning, after

the advanced guard was attacked and driven in.. I saw him cheering his

men, and by his example, inspiring confidence in all who saw him. When

he received the wound, I cannot say. I was at a distance from him, and

busily engaged in attending to my own duty. About 8 o’clock, I received

a severe wound in my right arm, just above the elbow. As it bled very

much, and our surgeon was in the rear, I was advised to go and have it

dressed. On my way to re-join my company, I found my friend Kirkwood,

lying against the root of a tree, shot through the abdomen, and in great

pain. After calling to the surgeon, and commending him to his care, I saw

no more of him until the retreat was ordered, I then ran to him, and

proposed having him carried off. He said, “No, I am dying; save yourself,

if you can, and leave me to my fate. . . . I see the Indians coming, and

God knows how they will treat me.” Some weeks after the battle, the

ground was visited by American soldiers, to make such disposition as

was possible, of the killed, left on the field. The body of Maj.

Kirkwood was recognized by a pair of Indian moccasins, known to have been

in his possession. Many years afterward, as the present writer was

informed by Hon. John M. Clayton, the people of Delaware would have

given his remains an honorable burial in his native state, but their

identification was no longer possible. Maj. Kirkwood left but two

children, a son, Joseph R., and a daughter, Mary. The latter married

Mr. Whitely, of Delaware. Her son, Robert Kirkwood Whitely, was educated

at West Point, and became a captain in the United States army. The son,

Joseph R. Kirkwood, married Miss Gillespie, a descendant of Rev. George

Gillespie, the first pastor of White Clay Creek, and head of Christiana

churches near Newark, Del. They removed at an early day, to Bridgeport,

Ohio. Their only son died in infancy, so that the name of Kirkwood, in

this branch of the family, is now extinct. The name in another branch is

by no means rare. The numerous descendants of daughters, however, bearing

the names of Alexander, Allen, Large and McConahey, are well-known and

highly respected in the upper Ohio valley.

 

Page 539.

KOEHNLINE BROS. is one of the very best firms doing business in the

vicinity of Bridgeport. The business was founded by John M. Koehnline,

who was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1816. Coming to America in 1838

he located at Bellaire, Ohio; where he carried on a coal and ice business

for four years, shipping coal to the southern markets. Moving to Marshall

county, W. Va., he remained there until 1863, at the expiration of which

time he went to Bridgeport, Ohio, where he died in 1875. While living at

Bellaire he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Klemm, a native of Baden,

Germany. They were the parents of six children, four of them surviving:

Elizabeth, now the wife of N. Zimmer; Henry, William and John. William,

the subject of this sketch, is the junior member of the firm of

Koehnline Bros. He was born April 4, 1858, in Marshall county, W. Va.

After obtaining a good education in the public schools of, Bridgeport,

he worked for his father in the coal and ice trade until the death of

the latter. In 1878 the firm of Koehnline Bros. was formed, and still

exists, doing a very large coal and ice business at Bridgeport. November

17, 1889, he married Miss Rachel Fox, of the same city. Mr. Koehnline is

a prominent member of Belmont lodge, No. 109, K. of. P., of Bridgeport,

and an acceptable member of the Lutheran church. Three different times

this energetic, successful young business man has been honored by an

election to the Bridgeport council, of which he is a member at the

present time. A thorough republican in politics, yet he has always

conducted himself with such uprightness and wisdom that those of all

parties honor and respect him. John, the senior member of the firm, was

born March 14, 1841, in Marshall county, W. Va. He was educated in

Marshall county schools, and has done his share towards making the

reputation of the firm what it is.

 

Pages 539-540.

AUGUST F. KOEHRSEN, of Martin’s Ferry, a prominent hardware dealer and

roofer, was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, August 28, 1864, the son of

Peter F. and Emma (Walters) Koehrsen. His father served seven years as

an apprentice to the trade of cabinetmaker, which he followed in

Denmark until 1865, when he came to the United States. He resided

successively in New York, New Jersey, at Richmond, Va., and then came

to Wheeling, where he resided until 1871, when he made his home at

Martin’s Ferry, where he has since lived, being engaged with the

Buckeye Glass company. By his marriage, which occurred in 1857, he

had seven children, three of whom are living. Their mother died at

Wheeling, February 6, 1871. The subject of this sketch at the age of

sixteen began an apprenticeship of two years with James Clayland, of

Bridgeport, as a roofer, and then worked as a journeyman four years.

In May, 1887, he established a small business at Bridgeport, borrowing

the money with which to buy the necessary tools. He remained there

until January, 1889, when he removed to Martin’s Ferry, where his

business has steadily prospered and increased until he now occupies

the three floors of his business site. Mr. Koehrsen is one of the

most successful young busine5s men of the place, and has the good

will of all. He was married December 24, 1884, to Mary E., daughter

of William E. Freese, deceased, of Terre Haute, Ind., and they have

had two children: Newton S. and Charles O., the latter having died

in infancy. Mrs. Koehrsen is a member of the Methodist Episcopal

church. He is a member of the order of the Golden Eagle.

 

Page 540.

CHARLES W. KUCKUCK, a prominent merchant of Martin’s Ferry, was born

in Belmont county, Ohio, December 1, 1866. The subject of this

sketch received his early education at Martin’s Ferry, and sub-

sequently attended the business college at Wheeling. Before attending

college he was engaged with the Buckeye & Union Glass Co., as shipping

clerk, and after completing his education he engaged in the hat

business, purchasing the busines then conducted by Mr. Swartz. This

business he has since continued, and enlarged by the addition of

clothing and furnishing goods, and his establishment is now conceded

to be the leading clothing and hat establishment in the city. His

enterprise and sagacity in trade have fairly earned for him a leading

position among the business men of the place, and his public spirit

has made him one of the town’s valued citizens. In 1889 he, in company

with Messrs. Ong and Swartz, began the erection of one of the largest

business blocks in Martin’s Ferry, a part of which is in use as an

opera house. Mr. Kuckuck takes an active part in fraternity matters

and is a member of the I. O. O. F., the Knights of Pythias, the

American Mechanics and Foresters.

 

Pages 540-541.

JOHN W. LANE, a prominent business man of Martin’s Ferry, was born

near Williamstown, Wood county, W.Va., January 15, 1861. He is the

grandson of Samuel Lane, who settled in Upshur county, W. Va., in

an early day, and engaged in stock-raising, dying in 1886, and the

son of Perry Lane, who was reared as a farmer at the home of his

father, in Upshur county, and is engaged in that calling, in Wood

county, where he settled about 1856. The latter was married about

1860, to Susan Mail, and seven children were born to them, of whom

one is deceased. John W. Lane was educated in the common schools at

his home, and at the commercial college at Parkers- burgh. At seven-

teen he became an apprentice of Cole Bros., plumbers, machinists and

steam fitters, of Parkersburgh, and served four years. He then worked

at his trade one year in the Baltimore & Ohio railroad shops at that

place, after which he was engaged at Wheeling and Pittsburgh until

1,867. In the latter year he established his present business at

Martin’s Ferry, starting in partnership with his brother, O. B. Lane,

who remained a partner until July, 1889, since when the business has

been entirely in the hands of the subject of this sketch. His well-

known skill and talent for business has led to the building up of a

large and lucrative trade. Mr. Lane is a member of the I. O. O. F. and

Knights of Pythias, and in politics is democratic. He was married in

June, 1885, to Mary E. Murray, of Wheeling.

 

Page 541.

WILLIAM B. LEWIS, manager of the Laughlin Nail mill, of Martin’s Ferry,

was born at Wheeling, W. Va., August, 1842. His father, Thomas E. Lewis,

a native of Monmouthshire, England, was a mill-wright by trade, and on

coming to the United States in 1825, first settled in Baltimore, where

he resided several years. Removing then to Wheeling, he erected the

first two rolling mills at that place, the old Top mill, and the mill

which stood where the Baltimore & Ohio passenger depot now is. In

1850 he took a contract for removing a rolling mill from Cincinnati

to St. Lous, but died in Cincinnati May 11, 1850. He was married in

1838 to Emily Tyson, a native of Fredericksburg, Va., daughter of James

and Mary Tyson, a soldier of the war of 1812. She is still living with

her son. The children born to this marriage were six in number, and

three are now living. The subject of this sketch received his education

in the night schools at Wheeling, and when only seven years old began

work in the Top mill, where he continued until the mill was destroyed

by fire in 1852. He found employment in various mills until he was

twenty-one years old, when he went to Cincinnati, and until 1873 was

manager of the Cincinnati Railway Iron works. At the time of the panic

he went to San Francisco, where he was engaged in rail making two years.

During that period he had partly contracted with the Chinese govern-

ment for the running of a rolling mill in that country, but the death

of his wife compelled him to give up the project. Returning to

Moundsville in 1876 he remained there until 1878, when he entered the

employment of the Laughlin Nail company as a roller. In 1884 he became

a member of the joint stock company which erected the rolling mills at

Brilliant, and he was manager of the forge department of that estab-

lishment until January, 1889, when he accepted his present position

with the Laughlin company. Mr. Lewis is one of the most skillful iron

workers of the country, and as a manager he is very highly valued. In

social and public affairs he takes an active part. He is a member of

the Methodist Episcopal church, and of the I. O. O. F. and Knights of

Honor and National Union fraternities, and has served the community

three years as a member of the school board. Mr. Lewis was married

in 1865 to Camilla Carpenter, of Wheeling, who died in 1878. By this

union he had five children, William F., who represents his father’s

interests in a furniture store at East Liverpool; Laura C., deceased;

Thomas E.; Emma, deceased; and John, deceased.

 

Pages 541-542.

S. LOE, the well-known citizen and grocer of West Wheeling, Ohio,

was born in Old Philadelphia, Penn., February 22, 1832. His parents

were Robert and Catherine Loe, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to

Ohio in 1838, and settled on a farm owned by John Fink, where they

resided for about two years, they then removed to Bellaire and re-

mained there for a short time. Finally taking a farm on Gravel Hill

the father and his six sons operated a farm there for several years.

S. Loe was the recipient of an average common school education,

such as was obtainable to the young of those days. He went to the

“Old Stone Schoolhouse ” just below the present city of West Wheeling,

situated on Whiskey run. After leaving school Mr. Loe became a brick-

layer, having acquired the trade from his elder brother. For several

years the Loe brothers, six of them, followed the brick-layer’s trade

at Wheeling, W. Va. Mr. Loe worked in the Riverside mill for nine

years after abandoning brick-laying, and during all these years he

lost but twenty-four days from his work. In 1883 he embarked in the

grocery business and has since continued in this business, having

met with much success. He is classed among the enterprising citizens

of the place, and can be relied upon to aid any movement promising

benefit to the community. Mr. Loe and Miss Janes Boyles were joined

in marriage in the year 1852 and their union has resulted in the

birth of five sons and three daughters, one son and one daughter

being deceased. Mr. Loe is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and

his wife and sons are communicants of the Methodist Episcopal church.

 

Pages 542-543.

CONRAD LONG, of Martin’s Ferry, a successful business man, was born

at Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany, in April, 1836. Before he was two

years old, his father and mother died, and he was left in the care

of other relatives. At fourteen years of age he was apprenticed to

a tinner, with whom he worked until he was eighteen years old, when

in the year 1854, he came to the United States, in the company of an

uncle and aunt, who settled in Virginia. He came on to Wheeling, and

entered the employment with George W. Johnson, with whom he remained

two years. He then made his home at Martin’s Ferry, in 1856, and for

one year was in the employment of Mr. Dunlevy, whose business he

subsequently purchased. He was one of the first tinners in Martin’s

Ferry, and laid the first tin roof in the town and in eastern Ohio.

His services were consequently in great demand at various neighboring

places, and he built up a large business in tinning, to which he gave

his personal attention until 1884. His business grew rapidly from the

start, and in 1859, he purchased a lot on Washington street, and in

1880 erected a business block on Washington street on the site of

his old shop. To this he added a large store- room in 1887. His

hardware stock has been enlarged until he now has one of the leading

establishments of the kind in the valley, and also carries a large

line of agricultural implements. In 1884 his stock was considerably

damaged by the flood, but he has since repaired his losses. Beginning

as a poor orphan boy in a foreign land his career is one highly

deserving of consideration. Mr. Long is a member of the I. O. O. F.,

lodge and encampment, and in politics is a democrat. He was married

in 1858, to Kate, daughter of Ebenezer Clark, and granddaughter of

Elizabeth Zane. They have six children: Capitola, Charles, Howard,

Louise, Mattie and Elizabeth Z. Mrs. Long is a member of the Methodist

Episcopal church.

 

Page 543.

ALEXANDER LYLE was born in Mercer county, Penn., December 13, 1848, the

son of Alexander and Janette (McCarty) Lyle, natives of Scotland, who

emigrated to the United States in the year 1847, and settled in Mercer

county, Penn., where they lived for several years, subsequently moving

to Ohio. Alexander, Sr., was a contractor on the C. & P. railroad. After

the completion of the road, he was chosen foreman of the river division,

a position he filled for many years. Finally, retiring from railroading,

Mr. Lyle purchased a farm where he resided until his death, February 15,

  1. Alexander, Jr., attended the common schools of Belmont county

until fifteen years of age, at which time he began working in the

Belmont Rolling mills, and was occupied in this pursuit for twenty

years. After leaving the mills he was employed in various capacities,

but returned to his trade and worked in the mills at Brilliant, Ohio,

for one year. Abandoning the iron mills once more, he established a

grocery business October 12, 1887, purchasing the business from Parks

Loe. January 1, 1873, he took Anna Retta Worls to be his wife. She is

a daughter of Milton Worls. One son and one daughter have been born to

them, named: Harry A. and Anna, respectively. Mr. Lyle is a Mason. Mr.

Lyle has so conducted himself in his business and private life as to

command a large circle of warm friends, and to gain the respect of all.

His business prosperity fully attests his ability and integrity.

 

Pages 543-544.

WILLIAM B. McCLURE, M. D., a successful physician of Martin’s Ferry,

was born at Pittsburgh, July 4, 1848. He is the grandson of Judge

McClure, one of the pioneer lawyers of Allegheny county, and judge

of its court for a considerable time. This distinguished gentleman

lived to be about one hundred years old, and was hale and hearty at

that age, his death being caused by the breaking of a limb. Alexander

McClure, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born at

Pittsburgh, and was there educated. For a long time he was engaged

in civil engineering, particularly underground surveying for drainage,

but the later years of his life were spent at McKeesport, where he was

engaged in the mercantile business. He died in 1880. His wife was

Margaret, daughter of William B. McClure, a native of Pennsylvania,

and for many years clerk of the court of Allegheny county. He was a

member of the board of commissioners which let the contract for the

building of the second court house of that county, which was burned

several years ago. Alexander McClure and wife had six children, who

are all living. Dr. McClure received his early education at McKeesport,

graduating from the school there in 1868. He then studied medicine

two years with Dr. Hall, of Pittsburgh, after which he practiced

three years as a disciple of the old school of medicine. At the end

of that time he began study under Dr. E. W. Dean, the leading

homeopathist of Braddocksfield, and subsequently engaged in the

practice of homeopathy in Allegheny county. In 1880 he entered the

Pulte medical college,  of Cincinnati and graduated in 1882. After

practicing a time in Allegheny county he came to Martin’s Ferry in

1883, where he has since resided. He is one of the leading prac-

titioners in his school of the profession, and has an extensive

clientele. The doctor is active in social and public affairs, is

a member of the Presbyterian church, and of the Knights of Pythias,

the American Mechanics and the Maccabees fraternities, and in

politics is a republican. He was married in 1875, to Rebecca M.

Fleming, of Pittsburgh, and they have three children: Ray F.,

George C. and William A.

 

Pages 544-545.

JAMES McCUM McCONAHEY came to Bridgeport, Ohio, about 1840, and

was the first resident practitioner of Bridgeport. He came to

Bridgeport immediately after having graduated from the old Miami

medical college of physicians and surgeons. His marriage to

Catherine Steele Kirkwood, took place in May, 1845. The result of

this marriage was five sons and one daughter; two of the sons,

George G. and Robert Kirkwood, and the daughter, Mary M., survive.

Mrs. McConahey was a daughter of Joseph Kirkwood, who was one of

the pioneer characters of Kirkwood. His father was Col. Robert Kirk-

wood, commander of the Delaware troops in the Revolutionary war. He

was killed in action, at the battle in which St. Clair was defeated.

While Dr. McConahey resided in Bridgeport he did more for the ad-

vancement of the town, than almost any other man, and was repeatedly

requested to accept some of the offices of prominence, local and

state, but he preferred to follow his profession. His public spirit

led him to assist in any legitimate enterprise for the good of the

community, but his modesty kept him from accepting any other reward

for his labors than the esteem and good-will of his neighbors. Dr.

McConahey was also very active in religious matters, and was one

of the first to suggest the building of the Presbyterian church,

and he magnanimously mortgaged his own personal effects to secure

money with which to aid in the erection of this edifice. His

property was seized by the sheriff, to satisfy this mortgage, and

he only recovered it by paying a large portion of the church debt.

He was a sufferer from white swelling, from his boyhood, and while

his own pain was great, he never was heard to complain, and was

ever ready to alleviate the suf- ferings of others, to his own

physical detriment. He was one of the founders of the Belmont

County Medical society, and was the co- editor of its journal

for several years. His fame as a physician was not confined to

the town in which he lived, his services being sought by the

sick, allover the county and in the city of Wheeling. His death

occurred June 9, 1870, aged sixty-one, and was a great calamity

to the neighborhood. He left a host of friends and acquaintances,

his funeral being one of the largest ever held in Bridgeport. His

wife died May 30, 1887. George G. McConahey, a native of Kirkwood,

Ohio, born January 6, 1848, was educated in the public schools and

in the Linsley institute, of Wheeling, and was graduated from

Washington and Jefferson college in 1869. After studying law for

one year, circumstances beyond his control compelled him to abandon

this project and he has since been engaged in teaching. At present,

Mr. McConahey is teaching in sub-district No. 12, of Pease township,

Belmont county. Ohio, near Martin’s Ferry, this being his third year.

Margaret E. Payne, daughter of Mahlon and Jane Payne, became his wife

in 1882. Mrs. McConahey was born November 16, 1859. The result of

this union is two daughters: Felicia, born August 9, 1886, and Lucia,

now deceased, born July 12, 1883. Mr. McConahey is undoubtedly a

successful teacher, his record is unstained by any dishonorable or

mean act, either in private or public life.

 

Page 545.

T. McCUE – A popular liveryman of Martin’s Ferry, Ohio, is G. T. McCUE,

who is a native of Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he was born September

16, 1854, the son of Robert and Elizabeth (Gardner) McCue. The father was

born in Jefferson county, Ohio, April 24, 1824, and his wife, in

Tuscarawas county, in April, 1824. Robert McCue’s father was James

McCue, an Irishman by birth, having immigrated to this country. He

was a very prominent man in his day, having been the colonel at the

muster of Jefferson county during the war of 1812, he was also at one

time the wealthiest man in the county. His ultimate financial failure

was caused by the dishonesty of his so-called friends. James McCue

raised a family of ten sons and four dau~hters, five of the children

are still living. Robert McCue now resides near Mt. Pleasant, Ohio,

where he is engaged in the production of fine fruits and berries.

His seven children are living. G. T. McCue, the subject of this

sketch, was educated in the schools of his native town, and also

at Rehobeth, Jefferson county. After leaving school Mr. McCue worked

for a man by the name of James Russell, remaining with him for seven

years or more. August 2, 188o, he took Miss Samantha V. Carter to

wife. She is a daughter of Nelson and Mary Carter, and was born

June 9, 1855. After his marriage he engaged in farming in Jefferson

county. March 8, 1886, Mr. McCue and his brother established a

livery business in Martin’s Ferry, which they conducted until March

10, 1890, at which time he purchased his brother’s interest, and

now operates the business himself. He is noted for his stylish

driving horses, and also for his fairness to all. Mr. and Mrs. McCue

had one child, Jessie H., born May 17, 1887. He is a prominent member

of the I. O. O. F. lodge of Martin’s Ferry, and both he and his

wife are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and

are much respected by the community at large.

 

Pages 545-546.

DANIEL Z. McSWORDS, of Martin’s Ferry, a well-known retired druggist,

is a representative of one of the early families of this region. He

is the grandson of Archibald McSwords, a native of north Ireland,

who came to America during the Revolutionary war, with British

troops, but as soon as possible, after landing, joined the con-

tinental army, and served in its ranks until independence was

secured. Then coming west, he settled in VirgLnia and was engaged

for several years in the manufacture of Iron at Mooresfield. Sub-

sequently he came to Brooke county, W. Va., and engaged in farming

and stock-raising until his latter years, which were spent with his

son at Martin’s Ferry. He died in 1855. While at Mooresfield, he was

married to a Miss Moore, who died in 1815, the same year of the

birth of their only son, Amon, the father of the subject of this

sketch. Amon McSwords became in youth, a clerk in a dry goods store,

at Wheeling, and several years later, went to Wellsburg, where he

conducted a general store and acquired an interest in the glass

works there. About 1850, he removed to Bridgeport and engaged in

merchandise there, and on Wheeling Island, and several years

later, he embarked in the same business at Martin’s Ferry, in

company with Mr. Cable, in partnership with whom he also conducted

a meat market and a slaughterhouse. Before settling at Bridgeport

he had also been engaged in trading on the river, between Wheeling

and New Orleans. Being greatly interested in the culture of small

fruits, he spent his declining years upon a farm near the Ferry,

and was not engaged in business for some fifteen years, before

his death, April 16, 1874. He was married in 1837, to Indiana,

daughter of Daniel Zane, a relative of the celebrated Elizabeth

Zane, and three children were born to them: Orville C., Alexis A.

and Daniel Z. The subject of this sketch was born September 3, 1840.

He was educated at Martin’s Ferry, and at the West Liberty academy,

and then, in 1847, engaged in the drug trade at Wheeling. Sub-

sequently he removed to Martin’s Ferry and conducted the same

business here until February, 1888, since when he has been retired.

His was one of the leading drug establishments of the place, and

Mr. McSwords was decidedly successful in business. He is regarded

is one of the leading influential men of the town, and is socially

popular. He and wife are members of the Episcopal church, and he is

a member of the Senior Order of American Mechanics, the Maccabees

and Foresters. Mr. McSwords was married in 1883, to Laura Barnhill,

of Bellaire.

 

Pages 546-547.

WILLIAM MANN, of Martin’s Ferry, a prominent manufacturer, was born at

Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, Scotland, October 28, 1845. His parents,

James L. and Elizabeth (Walker) Mann, were both natives of the shire

of Fife, Scotland, and the father was for over twenty-five years

engaged with the Summerlea Iron company of Coatbridge, in the black-

smithing and carpentry department. He brought his family to the

United States in 1876, and was occupied for a short time in farming,

but at present resides at Little Falls. His wife died in 1889. They

had six children, five of whom are now living. The subject of this

sketch received his education at his home in Scotland. He served

an apprenticeship of five years in pattern making in the Summerlea

Iron works, and then took a position in the Atlas foundry and machine

shops, where, after six months’ experience, he was promoted foreman,

a position he held for three years, and until his immigration to

America. Soon after reaching this country, he became engaged with the

firm of D. M. Ford & Co., of Chicago, and soon afterward removed to

Pittsburgh, where, for three years, he held a position with Dixon,

Marshall & Co. Coming to Martin’s Ferry in about 1874, he entered the

employment of Culperston, Wiley & Co., as pattern maker, and remained

with that house until 1879, when he leased the works, and embarked

in business on his own account. Subsequently he became the sole owner

of the works, now the largest foundry and machine shop in Martin’s

Ferry. Besides this important property, Mr. Mann is a stockholder in

other larger manufactories and is widely known as a successful and

prosperous business man. His success in life is owing to his own

industry and business skill, as he began in this country without

capital. He is a public spirited citizen, and active in social

enterprises. He and wife, whose maiden name was Janet McGilvray,

are active members of the Presbyterian church. In politics he is a

republican.

 

Page 547.

EBENEZER MARTIN, founder of Martin’s Ferry, born November 9, 1791,

on what is now the site of the Benwood blast furnace, died January

15, 1876, was one of the most widely known pioneers of eastern Ohio.

He was the son of Absalom Martin, a native of New Jersey, who

assisted in the earliest government surveys of Ohio, and received

therefor a grant of 640 acres near the site of Martin’s Ferry, on

the west side of the river. During the war of the revolution he had

been a gallant soldier, and he held the rank of captain. He settled

upon his grant in the latter part of the last century and died there

in 1800. In 1789 he was married to Catherine, daughter of Ebenezer

Zane, and they had two children, a daughter, who died young, and

Ebenezer, the subject of this sketch. The spirit of the latter may

be judged by the fact that he traveled on horseback from his Ohio

home to Princeton, N. J., to obtain an education. On his return home

he took charge of the farm and continued to manage it during the

remainder of his life, and after his father’s death also conducted

the ferry which the elder Martin established over the Ohio river,

and retained control of this until 1840, when he sold it to Hugh

Nichols. In 1835 he layed out the town which was known until recent

years as Martinsville, but now as Martin’s Ferry. He devoted his

life to the care of his property, and devoted considerable time to

fruit raising, having one of the best orchards in the valley. To

this, such was his charity and kindness, all poor people had

free access. His faith in human nature was imposed upon by many

dishonest rogues, and most of his property had passed out of his

hands before his death. His good deeds were beyond number, and

all mourned his death. His religious affiliation was with the

Methodist church, to which he gave a lot when he platted the

town, and in politics he was a whig and afterward a republican.

Mr. Martin was first married in 1809, to Hannah McLaughlin, a

daughter of Elizabeth Zane, and by this union he had nine children,

of whom one survives: Catherine E. In 1837, his first wife having

died, he married Minerva, daughter of Isaac Zane, and they had ten

children: Isaac, Rebecca V., wife of Mr. Van Pelt, of Lansing, Mich.;

Ebenezer, of Lake Harbor, Mich.; Edith M., deceased; Leonidas, of

Lake Harbor, Mich.; Antoinette, of the same place; Annie M., wife

of William H. Wood; Lucian B., of Fostoria, Ohio, and two who died

in infancy. Three of the sons by the first marriage were soldiers

in the war of the rebellion. Absalom died in a hospital at St.

Louis; John M., a transport pilot, and Ephraim, who died from

disease contracted in the service. Ebenezer, Jr., also served

in the First Virginia regiment.

 

Pages 547-548.

JOHN P. MAYWOOD, manager of the Hotel Maywood, of Martin’s Ferry,

was born in Philadelphia, May 30, 1832, the son of William and

Dorcas (Paul) Maywood, both natives of Pennsylvania. His grandfather,

William Maywood, a native of county Tyrone, Ireland, came to America

previous to the revolution and settled at Philadelphia. He was a soldier

of the war of 1812. William Maywood, born at Philadelphia about 1785,

was a bricklayer by trade, and was extensively engaged in contracting

in that and other cities. He also served in the war of 1812, and died

while engaged in building at Pittsburgh, in 1832. His wife died in 1839.

Of their four children, three are now living. The subject of this sketch

received his education at Philadelphia, and then served an apprenticeship

of five years in carpentry, a trade which he followed until recent years.

At the outbreak of the rebellion he was one of the first to enlist in

Baker’s regiment, which afterward became the Seventy-first Pennsylvania,

and he served while with the army of the Potomac, in all its battles

until the battle of Antietam, when he was wounded in the hip, and dis-

charged from active service. Afterward re-enlisting as a carpenter he

was promoted to overseer and aided in the construction of all the bridges

between Nashville and Atlanta. Returning home after the close of the war

he followed his trade until 1888, when he took charge of the old Hanover

hotel at Martin’s Ferry, the name of which he changed to Hotel Maywood.

This he has made an inviting and well-kept establishment. Mr. Maywood was

married in 1862, to Caroline, daughter of Joseph Kim, a well known pioneer.

She died in 1871, leaving three children: Joseph J., Jennie F. and Maggie

She was a devoted member of the Presbyterian church. In 1874 he

married Rebecca Woler, his present wife. Mr. Maywood is a member of

the Presbyterian church, and of the Masonic fraternity, and the democratic

party.

 

Pages 548-549.

THOMAS J. MEARS, of Martin’s Ferry, a prominent manufacturer, was born

at Wellsville, Ohio, August 9, 1848. His father, Thomas Mears, a native

of Ireland, came to America in 1836, and settled at Montreal, Canada,

which he left, however, two years later to come to the United States.

His occupation at that time was road contracting, Going to Defiance

in 1839, he secured the contract for digging a part of the Maumee

canal, on which he was occupied two years. He then made his residence

at Wellsville, and graded two miles of the Cleveland & Pittsburgh

railroad from that place to Yellow creek, also graded the road through

Martin’s Ferry. Another of his works was the pike road from Martin’s

Ferry to Mt. Pleasant. He died while working on the contract for

railroad construction through Martin’s Ferry. By his marriage to

Jane Callahan, who survives, he had four children. The subject of

this sketch, after receiving his education at Martin’s Ferry, learned

the cooper’s trade, which he followed about ten years. In 1873 he

started a small factory in company with William Houge, George Watson

and John Bowen; but this enterprise was short lived. In the following

January he again embarked in the business in company with D. Park, on

the site of the works. In 1878 their works were destroyed by fire,

but immediately rebuilt. On the death of Mr. Park in 1881, Mr. Mears

became sole proprietor, at which he still remains. His establishment

is the most extensive manufactory of casks, barrels, kegs and boxes

in the upper Ohio valley, and its prosperous development is the most

eloquent commentary upon the business ability of its founder. Mr.

Mears has still other important interests, being one of the organizers

of the Northwood Glass works, and a director of the same, a stockholder

in the Crystal Glass works of Bridgeport, also in the Junction Iron

works at Mingo Junction, the Elson Glass works, and he manages a

factory at Bellaire in connection with his factory at this place,

and owns a general store on Washington street. His investments at

Martin’s Ferry are many and important, and he is regarded as one of

the notable and influential men of the place. He has taken no active

part in politics, though he has served upon the council and as

township clerk. He is a member of the Catholic church of Wheeling.

Mr. Mears was married in 1882 to Emma, daughter of William Watson,

of this place, and they have four children: Emma, Jane P., Inez A.

and Lucy B.

 

Page 549.

SAMUEL MILLIGAN is one of ten children born to George and Mary

(Pasters) Milligan, his birth occurring October 3, 1829, on Short

creek, Jefferson Co., Ohio. George Milligan was born in Ireland.

Emigrating to the United States at an early date, he settled in

Jefferson county, where he raised his family of four sons and six

daughters, three of the sons and four daughters survive. Samuel

Milligan attended the common schools of Jefferson county, and at

the age of eighteen years entered the butcher trade at Warrenton,

Ohio. Mr Milligan moved from Warrenton to Martin’s Ferry, where

he entered the meat business, but subsequently was engaged in

boating on the Ohio river, continuing in this occupation until

1853, when he returned to Martin’s Ferry and again embarked in

the meat business, which he still conducts. His marriage to Mary

Allender took place in July, 1853, shortly after his return to

this city. Mrs. Milligan’s parents were Robert and Margaret

Allender. Mr. and Mrs. Milligan have been blessed by the birth

of five sons and seven daughters, seven of these children are

still living, forming a very happy home. Mr. Milligan is a member

of the Martin’s Ferry lodge of the I. O. O. F., and is held in

high esteem by all with whom he comes in contact. His business

is one of the largest of the kind in the city, and has been made

so only by the honesty of its owner and by his business ability.

 

Pages 549-550.

MATTHEW C. MITCHELL, ex-mayor of Martin’s Ferry, was born near

Mt. Pleasant, Belmont county, July 22, 1840. Of that county

Thomas Mitchell, his grandfather, was one of the early settlers,

purchasing at an early day a large tract of land at Scotch Ridge,

from the government, and farming there until his death, about

  1. John P. Mitchell, a son of the latter, was born in 1802,

and was reared upon the farm, where he lived and engaged in

agriculture until 1873, when he died. By his wife, Mary M.

Theaker, to whom he was married in 1839, and who is still

living, he had five children, two of whom are living, besides

the subject of this sketch. The la,tter, after attending the

common schools, entered successively Haysville and Oberlin

colleges, and after completing his studies there he accepted a

position in the United States patent office, under the commis-

sioner, Thomas L. Theaker, his mother’s brother. He remained

there until 1869, and then returned home to take charge of the

home farm. In 1876 he removed to Martin’s Ferry, and embarked in

the grocery business in which he was successfully engaged until

  1. Having taken an active part in municipal affairs, and being

a public-spirited and popular citizen, he was elected in 1878 to

the offices of justice of the peace and mayor. The former office

he held six years. The mayor’s office he has occupied ever since,

excepting two years in which he was compelled to give his attention

to his private affairs. During this period he acted as assistant

manager of the stove foundry, of which he was one of the directors.

At the end of that time he was again elected mayor. Mr. Mitchell

is a leader in the republican party, and was one of the delegates

to its last state convention. In 1889, he served as chairman of the

senatorial convention of Belmont and Harrison counties. At the

centennial exposition at Columbus he represented Belmont county as

commissioner. He is prominent in several fraternal organizations,

being a Knight Templar in the Masonic order, and a member of the

Knights of Pythias and the Odd Fellows. He and wife are members of

the Presbyterian church. Mr. Mitchell was married September 20,

1877, to Mary E. Kennon, granddaughter of Judge William Kennon,

and daughter of Ellis Kennon. By this union he has five children:

Kennon, Ellen S., Mary T., Sarah B., and Ruth M. He tendered

his resignation as mayor, to take effect March 31, 1890, to accept

the position of postmaster to which he was appointed by the

president, March 7, 1890.

 

Pages 550-551.

ROCKWELL B. MITCHELL, the present mayor of Bridgeport, was born in

Bridgeport, Ohio, January 6, 1857. His early youth was spent in the

public schools of Bridgeport, and also at the Cannonsburg academy,

at Cannonsburg, Ohio. After leaving school he worked on a farm some

time. Nothing suiting him better than the useful occupation of a

farmer, he has always been connected with farming more or less, Mr.

Mitchell has figured prominently in the politics of his section,

having been elected to fill the responsible position of township

treasurer, and serving two terms as corporation treasurer of Bridge-

port, also two terms as assessor. In. the spring of 1888, the

democratic party nominated him for mayor of his native city. The

good esteem in which he was held by his fellow townsmen was attested

by his election. He is a member of the Belmont lodge No. 109, K.

of P., also Golden Eagles, Washington Castle No. 5, American Mechanics,

and Knights of the Maccabees. His father, Vincent Mitchell, was also

a very prominent man in his time. He was a native of York, Penn., as

was also his first wife, Nancy. Both of them were of Scotch-Irish

descent. Vincent Mitchell received a very liberal education. After

leaving school he worked upon a farm until he accepted a situation

with his brother as a clerk in the latter’s general merchandise

store, in which capacity he continued until he purchased the

business. He carried on the business for some twenty-five years,

at the expiration of which time he sold out his store and moved

to Bridgeport, Ohio. Here he, with others, built and started a

foundry undes the firm name of Thacker, Mitchell & Co. The business

was continued for four years. His first wife having died he married

Miss Susanna Hogg, by whom he had three children, all of whom are

living: Miriam, Jennie and John T. Mrs. Mitchell died in 1840.

Ten years later, on March 14, he was again married, this time to

Josephine Kirkwood, a daughter of Joseph Kirkwood, who was one of

the founders of Bridgeport, at which place he settled at a very

early date. He was a son of Robert Kirkwood, of Revolutionary fame,

having served with great distinction under General George Washington.

When Joseph Kirkwood came to Bridgeport, then Canton, he owned and

operated a farm on the tract of land which is now known as Kirkwood.

He continued as a farmer until his death, which occurred in 1856.

His wife was the daughter of Rev. George Gillespie, the famous

Scotch divine, who was sent to England by parliament. Ten children

were born to Margaret and Joseph Kirkwood, four of them are still

living: Capt. R. Kirkwood was killed in the battle at which St.

Clair was defeated; Sarah E., who married Joseph Large; Elizabeth,

the widow of William Kennon, Jr., at one time a prominent attorney

of St. Clairsville; Margaret, who married Rev. James Alexander,

of the Presbyterian church, then stationed at Martin’s Ferry, and

Josephine, the wife of Vincent Mitchell, who is now deceased. Eight

children blessed the marriage of Vincent Mitchell and Josephine

Kirkwood, seven of these are living: Margaret G., the wife of Shields

McCurdy, a Methodist minister now living at Crafton, Penn.;

William, Harriet L., Emma and Euna, twins, Walter, and Rockwell B.,

the present mayor of Bridgeport. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell are active

members of the Presbyterian church, and raised their large family

of children in that faith. Seldom is a family seen that has kept

its record cleaner than has this’ branch of the Mitchell family.

 

Pages 551-552.

JOSEPH B. MONTGOMERY, one of the leading business men of Martin’s Ferry,

was born at Benwood, W. Va., in 1844; of that part of the county, his

grandfather, Thomas Montgomery, a native of Ireland, was one of the

early settlers. He made his home first at Sheppardstown, Va., but

afterward removed to Marshall county, where he lived the remainder of

his life. He was a farmer by occupation. His son, William Montgomery,

the father of Joseph B., was born near Sheppardstown, in 1815. His life

has been devoted to farming, an occupation in which he has been quite

successful. He is still living at Wheeling. About 1859 he was married

to Elizabeth Blakemore, who died in 1888, and they had ten children,

two of whom are deceased. The subject of this sketch was educated at

Wheeling, where his parents removed when he was ‘six months old. Until

he was twenty-three years, he was occupied as a cooper, and he then

engaged in farming, which he followed until 1884, when he came to

Martin’s Ferry, and erected the first business house in that part of

the city, known as the orchard.” Here he began, on a small scale, a

grocery and provision store, out of which his enterprise and talent

for business has developed one of the most successful retail establish-

ments of the city. Since coming to the city he has thorouhhly identified

himself with its affairs, and he is regarded as one of its most valuable

citizens. He has particularly devoted himself, and with much success,

to the advancement of that part of the city in which he is located. In

1887, he was elected to the board of education from the Third ward,

and through his efforts the new school-house was located in that ward.

In 1888 he was elected to the city council from the same ward. In

politics he is a republican. He is a member of the Methodist church,

and of the I. O. O. F. In 1864 Mr. Montgomery enlisted in Company I,

Fifth Ohio cavalry, and served until the close of the war, under

Kilpatrick, in Sherman’s march to the sea. Mr. Montgomery was married

in 1867 to Elizabeth Caswell, of Wheeling, and they have two children,

Robert C. and Howard D.

 

Page 552.

HARRY NORTHWOOD, general superintendent and manager of the Northwood

Glass works of Martin’s Ferry, was born in Staffordshire, England,

in 1860. He is one of nine children of John Northwood, of Wordsley,

Staffordshire, one of the leading glass manufacturers of England,

and one of those who, in 1870, produced the work which received the

grand prize of the Legion of Honor. He is a very skillful and

artistic glass carver, and at one time produced a vase which was

valued at $25,000, and was sold to Tiffany & Co., New York. The subject

of this sketch, at the age of fourteen years, entered the glass factory

as an apprentice and served seven years in that capacity. He then came

to the United States, on a venture, hardly expecting to remain, but

coming on to Wheeling, he entered the employment of the Hobbs Glass

company as manager of the etching department, a position he held for

eighteen months. He then held the position of designer for the La Belle

Glass works, of Bridgeport, until the flood of 1884, when he went to

Phillipsburg, and for a year was engaged with the Phoenix company. The

La Belle works by that time were again in operation, and he accepted

the general management of the same, filling that place until the

establishment was destroyed by fire in 1887. In December of that year,

in company with Henry Helling, Henry Floto, William Mears and Thomas

Mears, he organized the Northwood Glass company, now one of the important

manufacturing corporations of the valley. Possessed of unusual mechanical

skill and knowledge, as well as tact as a manager, Mr. Northwood has

already, though comparatively young, achieved notable success in life.

He is active and enterprising in social affairs, and public spirited,

and is one of the lessees of the opera house, a favorite institution

of the place. He is a member of the Episcopal church, the Masonic

fraternity and Knights of Pythias, and is a republican. He was married,

in 1882, to Clara E. Beaumont, of England, and th~y have two children:

Clarence and Mabel.

 

Pages 552-553.

ALBERT R. ONG, M. D., physician and druggist, of Martin’s Ferry, was

born in Jefferson county, Ohio, near Smithfield, October 9, 1847.

He is a descendant of one of the oldest and best known families of

Jefferson county. His father, Moses Ong, was born in that county

December 20, 1810, and in 1831 was married to Anna Cain, by whom he

had fourteen children, ten of whom, besides the subject of this

sketch, survive. The mother died in 1874, but the father, whose life

has successfully been devoted to farming and stock-raising, is still

living, aged seventy-nine years. Dr. Ong received his early schooling

in Jefferson county, and subsequently entered Allegheny college, at

Meadville, Penn., where he was graduated in 1872. Soon afterward he

was called to the chair of mathematics and astronomy and the vice-

residency of Richmond college, Jefferson county, a position he held

for three years. Then determining to adopt the profession of medicine,

he pursued the study under Dr. Clancy, of Smithfield, with whom he

remained three years. In 1875-6 he attended the Ohio medical college,

of Cincinnati, and in 1876-7 he attended at the Columbus medical

college, where he was graduated in 1877. In the same year he began

the practice at Smithfield, but in the following year removed to

Martin’s Ferry, and here purchased a small stock of drugs and opened

on a limited scale a drug store which he has developed into one of the

finest establishments of the kind in this region. Abandoning his

practice during the past few years, he has devoted his efforts entirely

to business, in which field his talent for affairs has made him

eminently successful. As a citizen he is highly popular. An evidence

of his public spirit is the opera house block, the finest building of

the city, erected by him and Messrs. Swartz and Kuckuck. He has served

as a member of the pension examining board since removing here. Dr.

Ong was married April 9, 1884, to Catherine Anderson, of Martin’s Ferry,

and they have one child, Frances H. Mrs. Ong is a member of the

Presbyterian church. The doctor is a member of the Society of Friends,

and of the Masonic and Knights of Pythias fraternities.

 

Pages 553-554.

CAPT. WILLIAM H. ORR, of Martin’s Ferry, was born near Abingdon, Washington

Co., Va., 1815, the son of William and Mary Orr. HIs father came to this

land from Ireland, his native country, about 1770, with his parents, and

settled in Virginia, where he farmed until the outbreak of the

Revolutionary war, when he enlisted in the continental army and served

until independence was achieved. He died about 1820. Three children were

born to him, of whom William H. is probably the only survivor. Capt. Orr

was reared upon the farm of his parents, and at seventeen years of age

began an apprenticeship at carrrage making, which lasted six years, after

which he followed the trade as a journeyman for a considerable period,

also engaging in stock dealing, traveling over the greater part of the

south. He removed to Wheeling in 1848, but soon crossed to Martin’s Ferry

and found employment in his trade with Wells Brothers, wagon builders.

Two years later he entered the employment of Hoyle & Griffith, man-

ufacturers of threshing machines, and when Mr. Hoyle established a

separate business, he went with him and held the position of foreman

over seventeen years. At the outbreak of the rebellion Capt. Orr, though

he had been reared in a slave state, promptly espoused the cause of the

Union, and was the first man at Martin’s Ferry to open a recruiting

station for three-year enlistments. He signed the roll September 2,

1861, the first on the list, and soon had forty men for the First

Virginia regiment, who were organized in Company C, with him as first

lieutenant. At his first battle, at Winchester, under Gen. Shields, he

was severely wounded, his shin bone being split by a bullet. In the

spring of 1862, Capt. Millhouse was captured, and Lieut. Orr succeeded

to the command, and served as captain until his discharge in 1864, at

expiration of period of enlistment. The record made by Capt. Orr as a

patriot and soldier, is one highly deserving of commemoration. On his

return to Martin’s Ferry, he resumed his position with Mr. Hoyle for one

year, and in 1866 he was appointed United States inspector and gauger of

spirits, a position he held for two years. Being elected mayor of Martin’s

Ferry in 1868, he served two years, and at the expiration of that time

established a bakery, which he conducted until he was wrecked by the

great flood of 1884. Since then he has been engaged in the real estate

and insurance business. He also acts as health officer of the city,

managing trustee of the cemetery, as which he was elected in 1889, and

is secretary of the Ohio State Saving and Loan company. He has lived a

life characterized by industry, patriotic devotion and public spirit,

and is highly esteemed by all. The religious and other organizations

with which he is affiliated, are the Methodist Episcopal church, the

A. R. and D. of R., and the republican party. He was married in

1852 to Jane A. Waters, and they have had three children: Alice W.,

Eva J., and Marian, now deceased.

 

Pages 554-555.

DAVID PARK, one of the pioneer merchants of Martin’s Ferry, was born

in county Tyrone, Ireland, in 1815, and is the only survivor of ten

children of Robert and Margaret (Reynolds) Park. The father, a farmer

by occupation, died in 1862, and the mother died in 1828. The subject

of this sketch received a limited education in Ireland, and assisted

his father on the farm until he was about eighteen years old, when he

spent two years as a clerk in a store. In 1838 he came to the United

States and settled at Pittsburgh, where he began as help in a whole-

sale grocery house, working his way up to a position in the office.

After working there four years he was assisted by a member of his

firm to establish a small store at Martin’s Ferry in 1842. He started

on a lot now owned by Conrad Long, and continued to do business on

Washington street until 1881. His business gradually increased, and

his devotion to trade, and talent for the occupation, enabled him to

become one of the leading grocers of the city. He took an active

interest in public affairs also, and for thirteen years served the

township as treasurer, and for nine years was a valued member of the

school board, serving at the time the old Union school was established.

He has also served on the city council. Though never an active politician,

he has been a steadfast member of the democratic party. For some time

he has been retired from business, and as one of the oldest citizens of

the town, is resting from an active and prosperous career. He was married

in 1838, a few months before immigrating, to Eliza McIvor, of county

Tyrone, by whom he had ten children: Sarah P., Eliza, wife of Rev.

Barnatz, lately of Wheeling; John R;, David, William H., Ross, Mary M.,

Fred J., secretary of the North Wheeling Glass works, and two who

died in infancy. Mr. and.Mrs. Park are members of the Presbyterian church.

 

Page 555.

OLIVER C. PARKER, a well-known citizen of Martin’s Ferry, was born in

Pease township, Belmont county, March 24, 1829. His father, Joseph

Parker, one of the early settlers of eastern Ohio, was a native of

North Carolina, and a son of Jacob Parker, who was born in the same

state, and passed his life there. Joseph Parker was a farmer by

occupation, and in 1805, crossed the Ohio and settled in Jefferson

county, near Harrisville, whence he removed several years later

and settled near Martin’s Ferry, where he lived the remainder of his

days, dying in 1855, at the age of seventy-seven years. He was

married October 21, 1801, to Mary, daughter of James Judkins, of North

Carolina, and by this union, had ten chlldren, of whom but two are now

living. His wife died in 1871, at the age of eighty-four years. The

subject of this paragraph, received his boyhood education in the then

limited schools of Pease township, and then engaged in farming, which

he carried on successfully, until he was compelled by a sunstroke,

received in 1872, to retire from active.affairs. He was one of the

most enterprising and thorough farmers of the county, and is now a

prosperous and highly esteemed citizen. During the term of four years,

he served the people of the township acceptably as trustee. In politics

he is a republican. Mr. Parker was married in 1864, to Martha J. Van

Pelt, who died in 1877, and in 1879, he re-married, his bride being

Mary K., daughter of Dr. S. B. West, elsewhere mentioned. She is a

member of the Presbyterian church. To this marriage there is one child,

Simon W.

 

Pages 555-556.

RHODES FAMILY – Perhaps no family has figured more prominently in the

settlement and growth of the upper Ohio valley, than the RHODES family.

Among the most worthy and noted citizens of Bridgport, the decendants

of this family take rank. In about 1800, Moses Rhodes moved from

Virginia, to Canton, Ohio, now Bridgeport, with his aged father. Moses

Rhodes was born near Morefield, Va., in 1784, and died in. Bridgeport

in 1871. While living here he married Nancy Martin, the daughter of

Col. Martin, who was one of the most prominent, as well as one of the

wealthiest men of what was then Virginia, now West Virginia. He was a

public man, and was a member of the Virginia senate at the time of his

death. Nancy, his daughter, was left an orphan at the age of twelve

years and was taken into the family of her guardian, Presley Martin,

who was a half-brother of her father, Col. Martin. Presley Martin was

also a noted politician and citizen of the vicinity In which he lived,

his home being at New Martinsville, which town he laid out and which

was named in his honor. Nancy Rhodes died in her seventy-third year.

Moses Rhodes was among the first to open a tavern in the upper Ohio

valley, having established one in what is now Bridgeport, at a very

early date. He also owned a ferry, and a boat yard, and speculated in

produce, which he bought for the New Orleans market and carried down

the river on a flatboat. Several times he made this, then, perilous

trip, walking back the entire distance to Bridgeport, carrying his

silver-money on his back in a sack. The return route lay through the

territory of the Chickasaw and Chocktaw Indian nations in the states

of Mississippi and Tennessee. The sturdy pioneer on two different

occasions sailed from New Orleans to New York, returning on foot to

Bridgeport. Later, he erected the Rhodes block, and two warehouses

in that town, and for years conducted a large grain and produce

business, also running a lumber yard at the same time. In 1852 he

retired from active business with an ample fortune, owning consider-

able real estate in Bridgeport and vicinity, and thereafter lived a

quiet and retired life until his death. In politics he was an old

line whig, and always took a decided interest in public affairs.

Although the Rhodes family were originally Quakers, he became an

acceptable member of the Presbyterian church, in which faith he died.

His estimable wife was a communicant of the Methodist Episcopal

church. This happy marriage was blessed by seven children, three

of whom are living. Martin died in 1828; Elizabeth P. and Caroline

S., the wife of Christian Ogleby, died in 1875. Lucinda, is the

widow of Luther l-farrah, a me~ber. of one of the first families

of Belmont county; Charles, who died In 1865, and Mary, now the

wife of William Thomas, of Pultney township, Belmont county, and

Elizabeth, who married William B. Kern of Middlebourne. W. Va.,

she died in 1861. It was of such stock that Ebenezer Rhodes, the

principal of this biographical sketch, came. He was born in

Bridgeport, June 26, 1818, and has since resided there. It has

been his privilege to see the place grow from a mere hamlet to

an important city, throbbing with industry, the seat of several

large iron mills and other manufactories, several of which he has

been active in establishing and maintaining. He received a good

education in the common schools, and afterward in Franklin college

at Athens, Ohio. Early in life he became connected with his father.

In the commission business, and under his wise tutelage laid the

foundation for a practical business education. Upon the retirement

of Moses Rhodes, his father, he and his brother-in-law, Ogleby,

succeeded to the business. Soon afterward they gave up the commission

business and engaged in the wholesale grocery trade. Eight years

later Mr. Ogleby retired from the firm, and Charles Rhodes became

a partner. About four years later, Charles was obliged to dis-

continue business on account of poor health, at which time W. S.

Warfield was taken into partnership. Some time after, Mr. Rhodes

bought Mr. Warfield’s share and took his son Charles into the

firm. In 1875 he turned the business over to his sons, C. M.

and O. T. Rhodes. Several years later Mr. Rhodes obtained an

interest in the Diamond flour mill, which he now owns exclusively.

This mill is one of the most valuable properties in eastern Ohio.

He owns considerable real estate in Bridgeport, and has been

identified with the various improvements in that city and

vicinity, being one of the originators of the First National

bank, and for twenty years its president. He was also for several

years president of the La Belle Glass works, also one of the

builders and directors of the AEtna Iron works. The citizens of

his native town honored him for twenty years by making him a

member of their school board, two years of which he was its

president. Mr. Rhodes was one of the directors of the Tuscarawas

Valley railroad from the beginning to its completion. On August

3, 1843, he took Caroline Townsend, of New Brighton, to wife. She

also descended from one of the oldest and most prominent Quaker

families of western Pennsylyania. She was laid to rest September

17, 1888. To Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes, eight children have been born,

seven of whom survive. He is an active member of the Methodist

Episcopal church of Bridgeport, and no one excels him as a good

and loyal citizen, and an earnest promoter of every good and

moral movement for the improvement of his fellow-men.

 

Pages 556-557.

CHARLES SEABRIGHT is one of the prominent contractors of Martin’s

Ferry. He handles some very large contracts, and is also a stock-

holder in the Spence, Baggs Company’s stove foundry. Mr. Seabright

was born in Germany, December 5, 1825, and lived there until 1849,

at which time he emigrated to the United States, and settled in the

City of Wheeling, W. Va. There he followed the trade of a stone

mason for two years, and in 1851 came to Martin’s Ferry, and engaged

in contracting. Mr. Seabright has been a contractor ever since, with

the exception of a few months spent in the meat business. June 18,

1850, he espoused Louise Myer, also a native of Germany. Louis,

Charles, William, Emma, Amenia, Louise and Lizzie are the children

of this marriage. The mother died in 1884, leaving a home bereft

of a tender mother and a loving wife. Mr. Seabright is a prominent

member of the I. O. O. F., and also of the K. of P. lodges of

Martin’s Ferry, and is a communicant of the Lutheran church. No man

in the city is more ready to aid any deserving charitable or

municipal enterprise than Charles Seabright. He is a public

spirited, progressive business man and citizen.

 

Pages 557-558.

HIRAM W. SMITH, vice president of the Commercial bank of Martin’s

Ferry, was born in Washington county, Penn., March 23, 1821. He is

the son of Henry and Barbara (Everly) Smith, who had four children,

of whom Hiram W. is the only survivor. The father was born in

England, and came to the United States at an early day in the

settlement of the Ohio valley, locating in Washington county, Penn.,

which was his home until death, which occurred in 1839, in his

fifty- fourth year.  He was in early life a school teacher, but

became one of the pioneers of the coal business on the Monongahela

river, continuing in that trade during the remainder of his life.

The subject of this sketch when but fifteen years of age, having

received a slight education in the public schools, became engaged

in the coal trade with his father and brothers. In 1838 he formed

a partnership with his brothers, Jehu P. and Lewis E., under the

title of Smith & Bros., and they continued in business until the

death of Lewis in 1872, after which Mr. Smith and his surviving

brother kept up the business until 1879, when the latter died,

and Mr. Smith disposed of their steamers and barges and leased

their mines. During a good portion of the time while in the coal

business, Mr. Smith acted as captain and pilot between Pittsburgh

and New Orleans, and gained an extensive knowledge of the lower

river. Having been a director in the First National bank of Bridge-

port, Ohio, from its organization, and acquired some knowledge of

banking, in 1872, in company with James A. Gray, he established

the Commercial bank of Martin’s Ferry, of which he served fifteen

years as cashier before being elected to his present position. In

1886 George H. Smith and James A. Dixon became partners, George H.

Smith was chosen cashier, and Dixon, assistant cashier. Mr. Smith

is one of the leaders in business of the town, popular with all,

and prominent in the various avenues of social activity. For

several years he has served as a member of the town council. He

and wife are active members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Smith

was married in 1844, to Martha, daughter of George Sharpless, who

was one of the first settlers of Belmont county, and by this union

had eight children, six of whom survive. This wife died in 1865,

and in 1867 he was maried to Angeline Lash, and widow of Platoff

McNeely, by whom he has two children: Ernest J. and Howard F.

 

Page 558.

THOMAS J. SMITH, one of the leading business men of Pease township,

Belmont county, was born in that county in 1824, the son of Col.

James M. Smith, one of the early settlers. Col. Smith was born in

Loudon county, Va., in 1790, the son of Thomas Smith, of English

descent, who served in the war of the revolution. Col. Smith was

a farmer and a cooper by occupation. He served one year in the war

of 1812, and then, in 1813, came to Belmont county, settling within

a mile of Burlington, where he lived upon a farm until his death in

  1. He held the rank of colonel in the state militia of Ohio. He

was married in 1809, to Mary Berry, who died in 1875, and by this

union had eleven children, four of whom are now living. The subject

of this mention was reared upon the farm of his parents, and became

engaged as a farmer, raising with his brothers, large quantities

of grain, which they disposed of by trading along the river. In

1854 he turned his attention to gardening, which he followed until

1879, when he purchased the stock of goods at Burlington, then

owned by Goodhue Bros. This he added to, and has since conducted

business on a larger scale than before known in the place, meeting

with considerable success, and acquiring a reputation as a skillful

business man. Burlington is one of the oldest trading points on the

river, a store having been established here over sixty years ago.

In 1881 a postoffice was established, known as Don, of which John

Smith was postmaster until July, 1888, since when the subject

of this mention has held the office. He is a member of the Methodist

Episcopal church, of the Masonic order, and of the democratic party.

He was married May 23, 1854, to Lucinda Jump, a representative of

one of the pioneer families, and they have had eight children:

Mary E., John J., Emery L., deceased; Amanda J., deceased; Louisa,

Kate E., Theresa L., deceased, and James W.

 

Pages 558-559.

H. TILTON is a leading citizen of Pease township, Belmont county,

Ohio. Mr. Tilton was born May 8,1846, the son of Joel and Cynthia A.

(Hartzell) Tilton. Joel Tilton was born March 10, 1813, in the state

of Ohio, Jefferson county. Cynthia Hartzell first saw the light in

Somerset county, Penn., November 4, 1811. Joel Tilton’s, father was

Joseph Tilton, who was born near the headwaters of the Buffalo, in

the state of Pennsylvania. His wife, Mary, was also a native of the

same place. Joseph came to Ohio with his parents in 1775, and settled

in Warren township, Jefferson county, Ohio. Here he went to work in

the woods, and by great toil and energy he acquired one of the finest

farms in the county, consisting of 640 acres. He was exposed to all

the hardships incidental to a pioneer life, often after laboring all

day in clearing his land he would be obliged to keep watch at night

for the approach of hostile Indians. The Yorkville coal works are now

situated on this farm. Joseph and Mary Tilton were the parents of

twelve children. The father died at the age of ninety-three years

three months and eleven days. His first permanent residence still

stands as a monument to the enterprise of this man; it is over one

hundred years old. Joel, the youngest child born to these parents,

was raised in Jefferson county, and was educated in the old piopeer

log school-house. His father deeded his brother and himself a part

of the old homestead. In Belmont county, the deed being dated

December 10, 1838, the witnesses being Dr. S. B. West and John Zane.

The instrument was drawn up by John Beazle. He was married to Cynthia

Hartzell, December 21, 1834, and their marriage was  blessed by

the birth of five sons and two daughters, named: Noah J., born

May 3, 1836; Mary McKin, now living in Kansas City, was born August

19, 1838; Indiana (Darrah) was born March 10, 1841, now a resident of

Jefferson county; Joseph was born November 2, 1843, lives near Bethany,

Va.; John H., born May 8, 1846; Francis H., born November 28, 1848,

lives near Tiltonsville; George W., born June 25, 1851, he lives on the

farm formerly owned by J. West. The dividing line between Belmont and

Jefferson counties runs through his house, so that he can vote in either

county. Joel Tilton died February 3, 1873. His son, John H., was ap-

pointed administrator of the estate. The wives of Joel, Noah J., and

John H., reside on the Joel Tilton homestead, and the sons, John and

Noah, operate the farm. They raise large crops of grain, and are

prosperous and thorough agriculturists. The family stand very high in

the community.

 

Pages 559-560.

JOHN M. TODD – One of the early pioneers and physicians of Bridgeport,

Ohio, is Dr. John M. Todd, who was born in Fayette county, Penn., January

26, 1826, son of Samuel P. and Susan (Kerr) Todd, natives of New York

and New Jersey, respectively. The father was one of the early physicians

of Belmont county, Ohio, having practiced at St. Clairsville at a

very early date. Samuel and Susan Todd had eight children born to

them, all of whom are living, six boys and two girls. He died at Union-

town, Penn., May 30, 1846, at the age of forty-four years.  Mrs. Todd

died at Claysville, Penn., February 23, 1884, at the age of eighty-six

years. The subject of this sketch received a common school education

which he obtained in the public schools of Washington county, Penn. At

the age of eighteen years he began the study of medicine, but before

he completed the study he entered the Mexican army under Capt. George

McCook, of Steubenville, and shared the fortune of occupation under

Gen. Taylor. After returning he continued his studies under the precep-

torship of R. F. Biddle, of Monongahela City, until he received his

finishing training in the Jefferson medical college, at Philadelphia.

In 18S2 he began the practice of medicine at Holliday’s Cove, Hancock

county, W. Va., remaining here until 1855, when he moved to the county

seat, remaining there for four years, when he left because of the want

of educational advantages. He then moved to New Lisbon, Ohio, where

he remained until the breaking out of the rebellion, when he took the

commission of surgeon in the field regiment, Sixty-fifth Ohio volunteers,

serving until 186S. Having resigned on account of a severe injury

received at Atlanta, Ga., came to Bridgeport and engaged in his

practice and also the drug business, he having continued the practice

until the present time. Dr. Todd has been surgeon of C. & P. R. R., in

which capacity he has served for twenty-three years. He was married

April 17, 1855, to Mary E. Wilson, daughter of Alexander Wilson, of

Monongahela City, Penn., a very prominent citizen of that city. They

are the parents of two children, both daughters, Ida V., who married

Frank P. Zimmer, of one of the prominent families of Wheeling, September

19, 1883, now residing at Omaha, Neb., and Eva May. The family are

members of the Presbyterian church. Dr. Todd is a member of the Branum

post, No. 271, G. A. R. Dr. Todd has acted as postmaster of Bridgeport

for eight years, beginning with Grant’s last term. He is an active

republican in politics.

 

 

Page 560.

W. TWEEDY, one of the leading citizens of Martin’s Ferry, Ohio,

was born in Mt. Pleasant township, Jefferson county, Ohio, February

2, 1842. His parents were William and Sarah (Worrel) Tweedy, both

Ohioans. Mr. Tweedy received a common school education in the

Jefferson county schools. August 8, 1862, he enlisted in Company B,

Fifty-second Ohio volunteer infantry, and for nearly three years he

endured all the hardships and dangers incident to a soldier’s life.

He was mustered out of service in June, 186S, and at once returned

to his home,where he engaged in tilling the soil. Subsequently he

embarked in the livery business at Mt. Pleasant, and continued in

this until the spring of 1890. He then sold his business and came

to Martin’s Ferry, where he now operates a large livery and feed

establishment on Walnut street, between Third and Fourth. He was

married September 20, 1867, to Miss Hannah T. Ong, by whom he has

had three sons and one daughter, they are: William A., Libbie M.,

George W. and an infant yet unnamed. Mrs. Tweedy is the daughter

of Abram and Elizabeth Ong, and was born September 27, 1847. Mr.

Tweedy has met with fair success in his business, and is a man of

strict integrity, and, although a shrewd business man, he is just

to all.

 

 

Pages 560-561.

THE HON. DAVID WAGENER, proprietor of the Buckeye Paper mills, was

born in Franklin county, Penn., October 10, 1827. His parents were

John and Elizabeth Wagener, both Pennsylvanians. David Wagener was

reared in Pennsylvania, living there until he had reached the age

of sixteen years. While still living in Pennsylvania, Mr. Wagener

learned the saddle and harness business. Coming to Ohio in 1843 he

worked in the paper mills during the evenings and at the carpenter’s

trade in the day time. In the spring of 1844 he and his brother

came to West Wheeling and built the paper mill now owned and

operated by the subject of this sketch. Mr. Wagener figured very

prominently in the politics of his state, having been elected to

the Ohio state senate in 1877, taking his seat as senator in 1878.

He served for two years, and after two years of retirement, he was

elected a member of the house. His term of office expiring, Mr.

Wagener retired from political life, and has since given his un-

divided attention to his business. He was a prominent stockholder

in the Wheeling Street railways, and was one of the originators of

the Wheeling Hinge factory. Miss Jane Clemens became his wife in

  1. She is a daughter of Mrs. Ann Clemens. Five children are the

fruit of this union. Mr. Wagener is an influential member of the

Presbyterian church, and one of the most progressive and broad-

minded men in the community. His public and, private career give

evidence of great ability and of strict integrity: As a senator

his vote and influence was invariably cast on the side of morality

and public improvement. As a business man he is regarded with the

utmost confidence by all with whom he comes in contact. A fine

specimen of a true American citizen and representative of the people.

 

Pages 561-562.

VAN WAGENER, M. D., was born in North Wheeling, May 3, 1853, of

American parentage, his father, David, being a native of Pennsylvania,

and his mother, Jane Clemens, a native of Ohio. Both of the latter

are still living. David Clemens was an early settler of West Wheeling,

where he was engaged in the manufacture of wrapping paper. In his

youth, Dr. Wagener attended the public schools, rounding up his

preparatory education at the Lindsay (Linsley) Institute, afterward

entering the noted old college at Washington, Penn. After leaving

college he went into his father’s paper-mill as a paper maker, which

he continued for two years. As surely as water will find its level,

so surely will the well balanced man find the position best suited

for him to fill; the young man was eminently fitted for the profession

of medicine, both on account of his education and natural abilities,

so he left the mill to take up the study of medicine, which he began

under Dr. W. S. Fischer, of Bridgeport, with whom he remained for

three years. Having received a thorough preparation in his chosen

profession, at the Ohio medical college, from which institution he

graduated, the young medical student attended a course of lectures

at Bellevue hospital, New York, in the years of 1876 and ’77.

Locating in the thriving city of Bridgeport, Dr. Wagener at once

began to build up the enviable reputation and practice which he

now possesses in no small degree. He is at present the county

physician, and also the assistant surgeon of the river division

of the C. & P. railroad. He is an honored member of the Belmont

County Medical society, also of Belmont lodge, No. 109, K. of P.,

of Bridgeport, and of the Charles L. Plinny Lent, No. 140, Knights

of the Maccabees. In 1879, Ada S. Harrah, daughter of Mrs. Lucinda

Harrah, became his wife. Dr. Wagener is a useful, honored citizen

of Bridgeport. The democratic party receives his vote and influence.

 

Page 562.

HENRY WARWOOD, of Martin’s Ferry, was born in Staffordshire, England,

February 23, 1823, the son of William Warwood, a skillful tool maker

who was employed during his active life in the Brades Steel works,

one of the oldest factories of the kind in England. He died in 1858.

By his marriage to Sarah Harrison, whose death occurred in the same

year as his own, he had nine children, of whom three are deceased.

The subject of this sketch received a limited education during his

childhood in England, going to night school while employed in the

factory where he began work at nine years of age. Coming to the

United States in 1848, he remained at Pittsburgh some time in the

employment of the Lippincotts, but was compelled by failing health

to give up that situation. Then starting a small tool factory at

Brown’s Coal works, he worked there until 1854, when he came to

Martin’s Ferry, and started in the same business on a small scale,

in the block where the post office is now situated, on the site now

occupied by Thorngate’s hardware store. He engaged in the manufacture

of garden rakes and miners’ tools, being among the first to

manufacture rakes in this country. The excellence of his work soon

gave him a widespread reputation, and his business increased until

in 1868 he purchased property on First street and erected a large

factory. He has for some time abandoned the manufacture of garden

rakes, and now produces miners’ tools exclusively, and these are

sold in every part of the United States where mining is carried on.

His coal pick is regarded among miners as the standard of excellence.

He is in all respects a self-made man, and his remarkable success

is wholly due to his talent as a business man, skill as a workman,

and the honesty of his goods. He and wife are members of the

Presbyterian church, and in politics he is a republican. During the

war he was actively engaged in recruiting men for the Union army.

Mr. Warwood was married in 1849 to Mary Bradshaw, a descendant of

John Bradshaw, a distinguished family of England, and they have four

children: William, Sarah J., Maria and Emily H.

 

Pages 562-563.

SIMON B. WEST, deceased, one of the pioneer physicians of Martin’s

Ferry, was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, in 1812, the son of Henry

West, one of the early settlers of that county. Dr. West spent his

early years on the farm, and began the study of medicine, about 1833,

with his brother, Dr. Henry West, then practicing at Bridgeport. He

completed his professional studies at the Ohio medical college, at

Cincinnati, where he was graduated in 1836. Coming to Martin’s Ferry

in the same year, he began a practice which he continued in for

exactly fifty years, then retiring, and devoting to rest his

remaining years, which were terminated by death in 1885. He was one

of the most eminent men in his profession in this region, and is

also remembered as one of the most enterprising of the citizens of

Martin’s Ferry, ever ready to aid in enterprises for the advancement

of the material and social interests of the place. He was one of the

directors of the Ohio City Nail company, and interested in various

other projects. Dr. West was married in July, 1838 to Mary Zane Martin,

daughter of Ebenezer Martin, and she died in 1882. Of their eight

children there is but one survivor, the wife of Oliver C. Parker.

 

Page 563.

BRADY O. WILLIAMS, M. D., a leading physician of Martin’s Ferry, is a

native of West Virginia, born in Wetzel county, November 13, 1847. He

is the son of Francis E. Williams, who was born in West Virginia,

August 18, 1809, whose life was mainly devoted to farming, though

in his earlier life he was occupied in selling produce on the river.

This gentleman, a worthy and highly respected man, died May 18,

  1. By his marriage, in 1844, to Ann J. O’Neill, also a native of

West Virginia; who died August 29, 1878, he had ten children of whom

five survive besides the subject of this sketch. Dr. Williams in his

childhood attended the schools at his home, New Martinsville, and

afterward studied at Mt. Union college, Ohio. He then spent three years

as a school teacher, during the same time reading medicine with Dr.

H. Cummins, of Wheeling. During the winters of 1871-2 and 1872-3,

he attended medical lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, at

Philadelphia, where he was graduated in March, 1873. In May of the

same year he opened an office at Martin’s Ferry, where he has since

remained. In the years of practice since elapsed Dr. Williams has

gained an honorable reputation as a skillful physician, abreast with

all the advancement of his profession, and devoted to the interests

of his patients. He has taken a due interest in social and municipal

affairs, is a member of the Presbyterian church, and has served

three years as a member of the school board. The doctor was married

in 1881 to Mary, daughter of Mrs. Caroline V. Grove, of St. Clairsville,

and they have three sons: Brady G., Phil F. and J. Forest.

 

Pages 563-564.

JOEL WOOD, of Martin’s Ferry, one who has by the promotion of various

important enterprises, rendered this part of the Ohio valley great

service, was born in Smithfield, Ohio, August 22, 1814. He is the

grandson of William Wood, a native of Pennsylvania, who was for

some time a resident of Frederick county, Md., and settled in Jefferson county,

Ohio, about 1810, becoming the first merchant of

Smithfield. About 1815 he engaged in farming, and his death occurred

June 3, 1844. This well-known and worthy pioneer was the father of

eight children, all now deceased. His son, Joel, Sr., the father of

the subject of this sketch, was born in Maryland, and there received

his education. He soon after removed to Ohio and engaged in business.

He died in 1814. By his marriage in 1804, at New Market, Frederick

Co., Md., to Elizabeth Poultney, who died February 8, 1844, he had

five children, all of whom are deceased but the subject of this

sketch. Both parents were members of the Society of Friends. Joel

Wood, the subject of this sketch, spent his early years in Smith-

field, Ohio, receiving such education as the various private schools

afforded, there then being no public schools provided bylaw. During

1829 and 1830 he attended the boarding school of Joseph Gibbons at

Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, and in 1831 and 1832, the school or college of

John Grummerre, at Burlington, N. J. The years following, before

location in Martin’s Ferry were spent in teaching school and in

merchandising in Baltimore, Md. On the 4th day of July, 1837, he

came to Martin’s Ferry and went into the mercantile business. On

the 30th day of August, 1837 he was married to Elizabeth Carr

McGrew, granddaughter of James Carr, first settler and proprietor

of Smithfield, Ohio, in Friends meeting house at Smithfield,

according to the customs of Orthodox Friends, of which society

they were members. About the year 1843 he sold out his mercantile

business and engaged extensively in the nursery and fruit growing

business until 1852, when he became interested in railroad enterprises,

and was appointed right-of-way solicitor for the Cleveland

& Pittsburgh railroad; remained with that road as their representative

in Martin’s Ferry, until 1871. In that year he associated with

himself Joseph Bell and Chester Hubbard, of Wheeling, and several

other gentlemen of Ohio, and organized the Wheeling & Lake Erie

railroad company. Elected as its first president, he served in

that capacity for five years, and afterward as a director for many

years. He was the pioneer of this road, which is now building into

Martin’s Ferry, and it will be a monument to his forethought and

enterprise. Mr. Wood has always been prominently identified with

the material advancement of Martin’s Ferry, being an early advocate

of plank roads and turnpikes. He was also one of the incorporators

and a director, continuously until 1890, of the Wheeling &

Harrisburg railway, subsequently called the Wheeling Bridge &

Terminal railway company. From early life he has taken a deep

interest in the cause of public schools, and in the moral reforms

of the day; especially those of anti-slavery and temperance. Soon

after coming to Martin’s Ferry, he was made a member of the board

of education and inaugurated the first steps which resulted in the

establishment of the union, or free school system, in 1853, and

which position he held for over thirty years. While yet a very

young man his interest was deeply enlisted in freeing the slaves,

and in 1837 he became a member of that hated organization, the

abolitionists, and at once took an active part in the work. He

cast his first vote for James G. Birney. Was made one of the vice

presidents of the Ohio Anti-Slavery society, and was sent as a

delegate from Belmont county, Ohio, to the national convention

held  in Buffalo} N. Y., in 1848, where was formed the Free

Soil party, and Martin Van Buren nominated for president. Both

before and after coming to Martin’s Ferry, he was the agent of the

Underground Railroad, and helped many slaves to gain their freedom,

oftentimes at great personal risk. In 1830 he become interested in

the temperance work; took an active part in the Washingtonian movement,

and has been ever since interested in all movements for the

suppression of the liquor traffic. For the past ten years he has

been identified with the prohibition party, and was a delegate to

the national convention held at Indianapolis in May, 1888, which

nominated Clinton B. Fisk for president. Five children were born

to Mr. Wood: George R., Mary C., William H., Oliver Russell and

Lucy J., the first and the last being deceased. Mr. Wood has always

enjoyed the highest standing for honesty and integrity. Although

starting in life with little, he has by strict integrity and

attention to business, accumulated a considerable portion of this

world’s goods.

 

Page 565

WILLIAM H. WOOD, of Martin’s Ferry, general agent of the Cleveland,

Lorain & Wheeling railroad, was born at Martin’s Ferry, in 1847, the

son of Joel Wood, a notice of whom appears in this chapter. Mr. Wood

received a thorough education, preparing for college at Martin’s Ferry,

and pursuing his collegiate studies at Earlham college, Richmond, Ind.

On his return home he entered the employment of the Cleveland &

Pittsburgh railroad, and was in the service of that company twelve

years. When his father resigned the position of agent at this place,

the subject of this sketch was appointed to the position, which he

held until 1875, when he resigned. He then gave his attention until

1886 to the manufacture of brick, and since the last named year has

held the position of agent for the Cleveland, Lorain & Wheeling road.

He has spent the greater part of his life as a railroad man, and is

thoroughly informed in all the details of the business. His courtesy

and efficiency render him one of the most popular of railroad

officials. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

He is in politics a prohibitionist, and he is affiliated with the

Knights of Honor, National Union and I. P. A. fraternities. Mr. Wood

was married in 1870, to Annie Martin, daughter of Ebenezer Martin,

noticed elsewhere, and to this union four children have been born;

Roy G., Charles M., Alice L. and Archie.