Belmont County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society

Colerain Township

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Create Custom Quickly Resume revise essays online DAVID S. ADAMS, one of the prominent citizens of Colerain township, was

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Cheapest College Essay educated himself in the practice of medicine, and was a successful

practitioner for several years. He remained in Pennsylvania till his

death. The mother was born and reared in Pennsylvania and was of a very

noted family. Our subject grew to manhood in Pennsylvania and came to Ohio

in 1838. He received a good common school education. In 1841 he married

Margaretta C. McNeely, daughter of William and Eliza McNeely. He was for a

number of years cashier of the old St. Clairsville bank, and served two

terms as auditor of Belmont county. To this union six children were born,

all living: William, Charles, Mary, wife of L. Danford, Stewart, Ella Lee

and Thomas. The mother was born and raised in St. Clairsville. This wife

died while he was in the late war, and in 1866 he married Mrs. Isabella

Robson, wife of John Robson (deceased). They have two children, Mark A. and

Anna. The mother was born in Ohio, W. Va., and came to Ohio when three

years of age. In June, 1863, he went out as a lieutenant, and on January

24, 1865, he resigned his position and was discharged on account of

disabilities. He was under Col. Wallace, Fifteenth Ohio regiment. He also

had two sons in the war, William, who enlisted in 1861, Company E,

Fifteenth regiment, under Capt. Danford, and Charles D., enlisted in 1862,

and was in the navy in what they called Mississippi flotilla. Mr. Adams has

always taken an active part in politics, and was one of the organizers of

the know-nothing party of Belmont county. He was at the head of the

movement in St. Clairsville, from which point the whole county was

organized. Along in the ’50’s he was appointed to fill a vacancy in the

clerk’s office of Belmont county caused by the death of William R. Carroll,

and after serving out that time he was nominated by the republican party,

and was elected over J. R. Mitchell by a handsome majority, and served out

his second term with credit to himself. He was the first wool buyer who

bought and shipped wool in Belmont county

 

Page 492.

500 word essay double spaced ISAAC G. COPE, a leading practitioner of Colerain township, was born

and raised in Farmington, where he now lives. He was a son of Caleb and

Mildred Cope. The Cope family has been connected with the history of

Colerain township since the year 1804, at which time George Cope removed to

Concord settlement from Frederick county, Va. A member of the Society of

Friends and opposed to the institution of slavery, he sought a home in

young and free Ohio. He was married in 1790, to Abigail Steer. They had

nine children, three of whom were residents of this township, viz.: Joshua,

George and Caleb H. Joshua Cope owned a mill near the source of Glenn’s

run. It was the first and only mill in Concord settlement. His residence

was noted for being one of the southern termini of the Under Ground

railroad; and in spite of the danger attendant upon such a course, he

helped many a forlorn and destitute fugitive on the way to liberty. George

Cope, about the year 1829, started a store in the town of Farmington, which

was for many years the only store in the place. He was an active member of

the Society of Friends, and especially noted for his adherence to principle

and unbending rectitude. Caleb H. Cope was born near the town of Mt.

Pleasant, Jefferson Co., Ohio, in which town he pursued the study of

medicine and commenced practice. In 1834, he removed to the town of

Farmington and continued the practice of his profession. He was for more

than thirty years the only physician in the township. The doctor was a man

of fine natural ability, and although in youth deprived of all advantages

of education, except those generally afforded by early settlers, he by his

own efforts acquired a good education, and always took an active interest

in the educational advancement of the country. Our subject was raised in

Colerain township and studied medicine with his father and attended medical

college at Nashville, Tenn., and located at his old home where he began the

practice of his chosen profession, and has now a large business, and is

regarded as a very successful physician. In 1865, he married Elizabeth

Dungan, and to this union were born three sons: Herman, Ellis, Isaac G.,

and seven daughters. Ellis is now studying medicine with his father. The

doctor was raised in the Society of Friends, and besides being one of the

leading doctors of the county, he is also one of the leading citizens.

 

Page 492-493.

professional resume writing services toronto DAVID COWAN, a farmer of Colerain township, was born in Pennsylvania, 1847,

and removed to Wood county, W. Va., when six years of age, with his

parents, where he remained till 1865, when the family removed to Ohio,

settling in Belmont county. He was a son of Robert and Margaret (Bowels)

Cowan. The parents were natives of Pennsylvania. Robert Cowan’s father was

an early settler of Pennsylvania, where he remained till his death. He was

of Scotch-Irish descent, and when he crossed the mountains he carried all

his possessions in a red cotton handkerchief. He settled in a new country,

but by hard work and close economy he made a great deal of money and died

quite wealthy. He lived to the good old age of eighty-nine years. Our

subject’s father died when he was only three years of age. He received a

good common school education through his own exertions. At the age of

thirteen years he began life for himself. In 1872 he was married to Aggie

DuBois, who died in 1870, and to this union was born one child, John A.

In 1882 he married Catherine Warner. Their marriage has been blessed with

four children: Jesse, Albertha, Carrie and Blanche. He and wife are members

of the Presbyterian church. In 1882 he was elected trustee of Colerain

township, and has served in all seven years, and acquitted himself with

credit to himself and constituents. He began in life without anything but

now owns seventy acres where he lives, and a two-thirds interest in 129

acres with his brother. He is one of the leading citizens of the township

and is well respected.

 

Page 493.

entrepreneur.com business plan DAVID HAWTHORNE, one of the pioneers of Belmont county, was born in

Jefferson county, Ohio, January 24, 1824, and came to Belmont county when

he was twenty-six years of age. He was a son of John and Martha (Boggs)

Hawthorne. The father was born February 26, 1786, in Ireland, and was

brought across the sea when ten weeks old, and was fourteen weeks crossing.

He was a son of William and Hannah (Bigham) Hawthorne, who were both

natives of Ireland. He was born May 1, 1751. She was born February, 1759,

and emigrated to America in 1786, and first settled in Washington, Penn.,

where they remained until 1810. They removed to Ohio, settling in Jefferson

county, where he remained until his death. Our subject’s father was raised

in Pennsylvania, and came with his parents to Ohio in 1810, and his father

gave him 100 acres of good land, but it was all in the woods at that time,

which he cleared into a beautiful farm. He was married to Martha Boggs,

January, 1814. Their children are: Hugh,B., William, Eliza J., Samuel J.,

David, Hannah, Mary A., Martha, Sarah, Margaret and John B., of these

children, six are now living: Hugh, William, David, Mary A., Margaret and

John B. The mother was born in Belmont county, 1792. The father was a

soldier in the war of 1812, and served through the war. Our subject was

raised in Jefferson county, receiving a very limited education in the

pioneer log school, and after reaching his majority he attended school and

finally began teaching, and followed that about three years. In 1849 he was

married to Margaret E., daughter of Archibald and Elizabeth (Lemon) Major.

They have four children; three now living: Martha E., wife of George W.

Chandler, of Chicago; Rebecca J., former wife of W. S. Barton, who is now

dead; Archibald M. and Adda V. The mother was born in Belmont county on the

old Major homestead farm. Archibald M. married Mary Oxley. He and wife are

members of the United Presbyterian church, likewise all the family. He

served as justice of the peace of his township fifteen years. He now owns

119 acres of good land which is well improved, and he has placed all the

improvements upon the same. He is a worthy citizen and representative

farmer of Belmont county, and is well respected by all who know him.

 

Page 493-494.

http://pghgrp.com/photography-essay-writing/ photography essay writing JACOB McMILLAN, a prosperous farmer of Colerain township, was born and

raised on the farm where he now lives, son of Jacob and Sarah (Vale)

McMillan. The father, born in York county, Penn., in 1796, died in 1884. He

was a son of Thomas McMillan, and grandson of John McMillan, a native of

Scotland. The mother, born in York county, Penn., in 1800, daughter of

Joshua Vale, a native of Wales. Our subject’s parents had five children:

Mahlon, deceased; Eli, died 1890; Sarah A., Elizabeth, Jacob and Ira V.

Jacob was raised in Belmont county, receiving a common school education in

the old log school-house. He and sisters own 101 acres of the old homestead

farm, where his father settled and remained till his death. He and family

were members of the Society of Friends.

 

Page 494.

reputable cost effective dissertation writers online SARAH A. McMILLAN, wife of Eli McMillan (deceased), who was one of the

leading farmers of Colerain township, was born in Pennsylvania, October 29,

1827, died January 5, 1890. He was a son of Jacob and Sarah (Vale)

McMillan. He was raised until about twelve years of age in Pennsylvania,

came to Ohio with his parents and settled in Colerain township, where he

grew to manhood. He received a good common school education. In 1865 he

married Sarah A., daughter of Abner and Mary (Dillon) Stillwell. The father

was born in Maryland, and came to Ohio in a very early day when St.

Clairsville was yet in the forest. He first settled in St. Clairsville, and

for several years followed teaming for a living. He began in life without

anything, but by hard work and close economy, he accumulated considerable

money, and at one time owned over 500 acres of land. He lived to be nearly

ninety years of age, a respected and honored citizen. To the union of Mr.

and Mrs. McMillan eight children were born: Sarah V., Mary L., Ira S.,

Isaac N., Albert E., Ina B., Edith O. and Ethel E., twins. The mother was

born and raised in Belmont county. Jacob was a member of the Society of

Friends and of the Masonic order. She is a member of the Methodist

Episcopal church. He was an exceptional son. His father bought a farm, and

while the other members of the family left home he remained with his

parents till he was forty years of age and paid out for the farm and placed

all the improvements upon the same. After marriage he purchased sixty-two

acres which he left to his family, also five-eighths interest in sixty-two

acres more. They are living in a stone house that was built in 1824. His

family is well respected by all.

 

Pages 494-495.

content writing services in mumbai DAVID K. NAYLOR, a farmer of Colerain township, was born in Smithfield

township, Jefferson county, May 28, 1818, son of A. G. and Ruth (Hammond)

Naylor. The father was born in Maryland, son of John Naylor, also of

Maryland, and came to Ohio in 1812, and settled in Smithfield when it was

in its infancy. He bought several farms and gave to all his sons. He was a

slave holder in Maryland, but on coming to Ohio set them free. He had in

his family nine children, five boys, our subject’s father being the

youngest. The mother was a daughter of George and Deborah (Hutton) Hammond,

natives of Virginia, and was of Irish descent, and in 1811 settled in

Smithfield township, where he remained until death. The grandparents on

both sides were very strict Quakers. Our subject was raised in Smithfield

township, received a common school education, beginning in the old log

school-house. He first began life by working in a stone quarry. He

afterward traveled in the mercantile business for five years, and then

established a store in York where he afterward lost all he had formerly

made. In 1852 he married Margaret Smith, daughter of Ephraim and Elizabeth

(Parkinson) Smith. Of their six children, three are now living. Elizabeth,

Ida M. and Harry A. The mother was born in Belmont county, where she lived

till her death, September 24, 1879. She was a member of the Methodist

Episcopal church. He is also a member of the same church. After he lost his

property in York, he removed to Belmont county, and was then fifty dollars

worse off than nothing, but by hard work and good management he has done

well, and now owns ninety-two acres of good land, which is well improved,

with good and substantial buildings. He served two years as justice of the

peace and resigned his office. He is a thorough-going farmer and a worthy

citizen.

 

Page 495.

Chemistry Teacher Help ISAAC VICKERS, a citizen of Colerain township, was born in Chester, Penn.,

son of Jesse K. and Margaret (Penrose) Vickers. The father was born in

Chester, Penn., son of Thomas Vickers, who was also born in Pennsylvania,

and a son of Peter Vickers, a native of England. Our subject’s father was

born in 1795, died in 1889, and all were members of the Society of Friends.

The mother, born in Montgomery county, Penn., daughter of Samuel and Sarah

(Roberts) Penrose. Our subject was raised in Pennsylvania till thirteen

years of age, and came to Ohio with his father’s family, crossing the

mountains in wagons. He received a good common school education. In 1842 he

married Rachel, daughter of Isaac and Deborah (Wiseman) James. To this

union six children have been born, five living: Leander, Albert, Morris,

Edwin, Samuel and Willis. Morris died when three years of age. The mother

was born and raised in Belmont county. They are members of the Society of

Friends. He is a man that began life without, anything, but by hard work

and good management he has done well, now owning 115 acres, besides a store

house in Morning View, where he does a general mercantile business. In 1856

he established his store and has done an honest and lucrative business

since that time. In 1867 he was appointed postmaster at Morning View, a

position he has held since that time, but when Cleveland was elected they

tried hard to find some irregularity in the office, but failing he was

allowed to retain the same.

 

Pages 495-496.

JOSIAH WATSON, one of the pioneers of Colerain township, was born in New

Jersey, December 23, 1798, son of William and Sarah (Ackley) Watson. The

father was a native of New Jersey, and was a militiaman during the

Revolutionary war, belonging to what was known as the Jersey Blues. He was

of English descent. Our subject came to Philadelphia when a boy about

sixteen years of age, where he grew to manhood. He received a limited

education and was bound an apprentice to a tailor, where he served five

years, and he then entered the post-office at Philadelphia, as letter

carrier, where he remained twelve years, when he resigned his position and

came to Ohio in 1837 and settled on the farm in Colerain township, which he

had bought in 1835. This he cleared and converted into a beautiful farm. In

1833 he married Julia E., daughter of Edward Parker. He was a native of

Pennsylvania, and for many years was engaged in the publishing business.

Two children (twins), have blessed this union, only one living, Charles H.,

who has been connected with Weather & Bro., in the manufacture of white

lead, where he has been engaged for over thirty years. He is a man that

began in this world without anything, but by close economy he did well and

at one time owned 106 1/4 acres of good land. He is now in the ninety-

second year of his age and in good health.

 

Page 496.

help with victorian homework MILTON YOST, a prominent agriculturist of Colerain township, and a

descendant of an old and influential family, was born and raised in

Harrison county, Ohio, the son of John and Mary (Wilson) Yost. The father

was born near Winchester, W. Va.; his father, Michael Yost, was born

November 3, 1766, died in January, 1865, was the son of John Yost, a native

of Germany, who first settled in Chester county, Penn., from there going to

Frederick county, Va., now W. Va. Mary (Wilson) Yost was born in New

Jersey, the daughter of John and Sarah (Atkinson) Wilson. John Wilson was

born in New Jersey, the son of Alexander and Nancy (Kennard) Wilson.

Alexander was an Irishman by birth. To John and Sarah Wilson five children

were born, named: Charles, George, William, Mary and Sarah. They all reared

families. Charles had one child: William C. George was the father of four

children: Charles, Sarah, George and Jane; Mary had four children: Rachel

Ann, John W., Lemuel A. and Milton; Sarah was the mother of three children:

Emily, John W. and Catherine. Michael Yost was the father of the following

named children: John, Elizabeth, Fannie, Elisha, Isaac, Hannah, Mary,

Elias, Elijah, Sarah and Margaret. John Yost emigrated to Ohio, in May,

1806, and settled in Harrison county, where he remained until his death. He

was prominently identified with the educational and general improvement

movements of the county, having served for two terms as a county

commissioner, and was a representative member of the whig party. When the

family moved to Ohio they bought land which was at that time in its natural

state. From this they made fine farms and became prominent in agricultural

circles. Milton Yost received a common school education, and in October,

1874, was united in marriage to Ellen C. Hall, daughter of David and Amy

(Smith) Hall. David was the son of Thomas and Mary (Patterson) Hall. To

Milton and Ellen Yost seven children have been born: Mary Rachel, Sarah

Amy, Edith Lora, Myra Kate, Florence Wilson, Clara C. and Frederick

Michael. Mr. Yost came to Belmont county in 1886, and located where he now

lives. His farm, consisting of 106 acres of land, is one of the most

improved farming properties in the county. It is finely stocked, and under

the highest state of cultivation. Mr. Yost makes a specialty of the dairy

business.